PREFACES AND TABLES OF CONTENTS

CENTRAL HARDWOOD FOREST CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

1976-1999

 

 

CONFERENCE  I--1976

 

SPONSORED BY:

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AT CARBONDALE, &

NORTH CENTRAL FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, ST. PAUL, MN

 

Preface of the First Proceedings

 

          With the proliferation of conferences and symposia during the past few years, the question of "why another one?" is likely to be raised.  The rationale behind developing the Central Hardwood Conference and holding periodic meetings is quite clear.  There is a necessity to draw attention to the Central Hardwood Region and conceptualize it as ecosystem that is substantially different from the northern hardwood-white pine-hemlock region and the southern pine region.  It is not an ecotone between these two regions, but an entity, the uniqueness of which is due to the dominance of the forest by approximately 25 species of oak and 10 species of hickory.

 

          Second, it was felt that there should be a way to periodically draw together the scientists and resource land managers who share a common interest in the central hardwoods; if not to present individual research papers on a variety of topics, then to concentrate efforts in a problem-solving approach or both.  At the same time, there seemed a need for publication of research papers on the forest.  The "Proceedings" serves this purpose, and over the years, it is anticipated that there will be a sizable volume of information concentrated within a few books.

 

          A longer term objective may be to facilitate or assist a coordinated regional research program.  While this objective is visualized, the neces­sity is real and the program to some extent already on paper.  Regional research plans have already been written by the SAF for inclusion in a national research program according to reports given at the 1976 SAF Con­vention in New Orleans.

 

          Such a research program will be substantially enhanced by, I believe, a developing "hardwood revolution" that is being fueled by the increasing demand for wood products combined with the presently undertapped resource of the Central Hardwood Forest and the dwindling supply of softwood timber.  For instance, recent Forest Service statistics show that the loss of loblolly pine stands to hardwood types over a ten to eleven year period is 58 percent in North Carolina, 58 percent in Georgia, and 66 percent on the Coastal Plain of Virginia.  The long term implication of these forest type changes, if they continue, is clear.

 

          A final word.  It seems appropriate that the areas to be considered by the CHFC are those of ecology, silviculture and management.  Certainly it is not possible for the Conference to cover all aspects of the central hardwoods, nor is it necessary as there are already no less than ten active groups and organizations covering topics such as tree improvement, Christmas trees, forest soils, mensuration, economics, and species like walnut and poplar.  There are also other meetings of timely interest that are sponsored by forestry departments within the region.  At present, the CHFC seems to fill the need for an organization concerned with ecology, silviculture and management of the central hardwoods.

 

            However, the question remains, "Where do we go from here?" in concluding remarks, Orie Loucks raises some thought-provoking questions which may require new and unique approaches to the management of the central hardwoods; these could be considered at a future meeting.  No doubt there are scientists and resource land managers who have additional, concerns.  Therefore, in order

to provide an input of ideas for future meeting topics, a steering committee for the CHFC will be formed in the near future.

 

            The editors and authors sincerely hope that researchers and resource land managers find the contents of this volume interesting and of value.

 

                                                                                                James S. Fralish

                                                                                                Editor

 

Table of Contents of the First Proceedings

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The Central Hardwood Forest.

F. Bryan Clark.  Page 1.

 

COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

 

Forest communities of dissected uplands in the Great Valley of east Tennessee.

W. H. Martin, III,  and H. R. DeSelm.  Page 11.

Oak-hickory components of upland forests of the Alabama Piedmont.

M. S. Golden. Page 31.

An ecological investigation of the Oakwood Bottoms Greentree Reservoir in Illinois. 

P. M. Thomson and R. C. Anderson.  Page 45.

Forest site-community relationships in the Shawnee Hills Region, southern Illinois. 

J. S. Fralish.  Page 65.

Climatic features of vegetation types in southeastern Illinois.

W. C. Ashby.  Page 89.

A gradient in understory shrub composition in southern Wisconsin.

O. L. Loucks and B. J. Schnur III.  Page 99.

Structural analysis of a stand containing yellowwood in southern Illinois.

P. A. Robertson and W. P. Pusateri.  Page 119.

     

FOREST SUCCESSION AND TREE GROWTH

 

A climax index for broadleaf forest: an n-dimensional, ecomorphological model of succession.

P. V. Wells.  Page 131.

Hard maples increasing in an upland forest stand.

R. C. Schlesinger.  Page 177.

Stem growth and phenology of a dominant white oak.

T. M. Hinckley, D. R. Thompson, N. P. McGinness, and A. R. Hinckley.  Page 187.

Effects of subsurface drainage on tree growth and forest succession.

W. F. Straka and E. J. Tramer.  Page 203.

 

TREE PHYSIOLOGY

 

Size and shoot growth patterns in broadleaved trees.

R. Borchert. Page 221.

Some morphological, ecological, and physiological traits of four Ozark forest species.

J. E. Phelps, J. L. Chambers, and T. M. Hinckley.  Page 231.

A characterization of daily and seasonal carbon dioxide patterns in a mid-Missouri, climax oak-hickory forest.

H. E. Garrett, G. S. Cox, and J. E. Roberts.  Page 245.

Leaf conductance to water vapor transfer from leaves of a black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) sapling.

P. M. Doughtery, T. M. Hinckley and J. P. Lassoie.  Page 259.

The effects of an extreme drought on tree water status and net assimilation rates of a transplanted Northern red oak under greenhouse conditions.

J. P. Lassoie and J. L. Chambers.  Page 269.

 

FOREST SOILS AND HYDROLOGY

 

Relationships between chemical and physical properties of a typic fragiudalf and growth of scarlet oak.

D. H. McNabb and G. S. Cox.  Page 285.

Site productivity of oaks in relation to soil taxonomic units in northern Illinois.

C. Robles, J. B. Fehrenbacher, and A. R. Gilmore.  Page 299.

Site index relationships for shortleaf pine and uplands oaks in the Ozark-Ouachita Highlands of Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

D. L. Graney.  Page 309.   

Hydrologic characteristics of mixed hardwood catchments in the Ozark Plateau. 

T. L. Rogerson.  Page 327.   

Streamflow and nutrient flux relationships in the Missouri Ozarks.

C. D. Settergren, W. F. Hansen, and R. M. Nugent.  Page 335.

 

NUTRIENT CYCLING AND PRODUCTIVITY

 

Nutrient cycling in oak-hickory forests I: precipitation, throughfall and stemflow.

M. A. Akhtar, G. L. Rolfe, and L. E. Arnold.  Page 347.

Biomass and nutrient pools in loblolly and shortleaf pine in southern Illinois.

G. L. Rolfe, J. C. Miceli, L. E. Arnold, and W. R. Boggess.  Page 363.

Seasonal variation in the nutrient composition of yellow-poplar leaves.

G. W. Smalley. Page 377.

Net primary productivity and phytomass of forests of the Tennessee Valley.

D. M. Sharpe. Page 387.

Full tree weight equations and tables for selected central hardwoods.

C. Myers, D. Polak, and L. Stortz.  Page 401.

Herbaceous productivity and species composition associated with harvest intensities in a southern Michigan mixed hardwood forest.

D. McEwen and G. Schneider.  Page 409.

                       

FOREST MANAGEMENT

 

Silvicultural cuttings in an oak-hickory stand in Michigan: 21-year results.

V. J. Rudolph and W. A. Lemmien.  Page 431.

Modal development of regeneration in clearcut red oak stands in the driftless area.

P. S. Johnson.  Page 455.

 

CONCLUDING REMARKS

 

Some implication for future research.

O. L. Loucks.  Page 477.

 


 

CONFERENCE  II--1978

 

SPONSORED BY:

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, WEST LAYETTE, IN,

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS, &

NORTH CENTRAL FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, ST. PAUL, MN

 

Preface of the Second Proceedings

 

          The concerns expressed by Dr. James S. Fralish at the first Central Hardwood Forest Conference (CHFC) are still in vogue.  There is still a need "--to draw attention to the Central Hardwood Region and conceptualize it as an ecosystem--", "--to periodically draw together the scientists and resource land managers who share a common interest in the central hardwoods--", and "--to facilitate or assist a coordinated regional research program--".

 

          The central hardwoods have long been viewed as a source of fine hardwood and the "hardwood revolution".  Dr. Fralish mentioned "--that was fueled by the increasing demand for wood products and the undertapped resource--" are in even greater evidence today.  There is continued national concern with the availability of usable energy-- wood as a full source has regained acceptance.  The increase In the number and different types of hardwood using industries within the region has resulted in not only a more com­plete utilization of the long time commercially valued species but also the utilization of species once regarded as having little commercial value.  Today, as never before, there is a need to understand the interrelationships of the Central Hardwood Forest.  This fact is underscored by the recent 1978 national meeting of the Society of American Foresters whose major emphasis was directed toward the multiple use of the Central Hardwood Forest.

 

                                                             Phillip E. Pope, Editor

 

Table of Contents of the Second Proceedings

 

COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

 

Structural change over a half century in an old-growth, oak-hickory forest in Indiana. (Abstract) 

G. R. Parker and J. K. Eichenberger.  Page 1.

Phytosociological and ordination analyses of the tree stratum of the beech-maple forest type.

C. P. Dunn and M. T. Jackson.  Page 2.

A comparison of forest vegetation and environment in the Illinois Southern Till Plain and Shawnee Hills regions. (Abstract) 

J. S. Fralish and Y. Katerere.  Page 22.

The forest vegetation of Wilson Mountain, Tennessee.

H. R. DeSelm, W. H. Martin, III,  and E. Thor.  Page 23.

White oak communities in the Great Valley of east Tennessee--a vegetation complex.

W. H. Martin, III.  Page 39.

Discriminant analysis of cove forests of the Cumberland plateau of Tennessee.

P. A. Schmalzer, C. R. Hinkle and H. R. DeSelm.  Page 62.

Variability in forest floor components in southwestern Illinois upland forests.

J. C. Luvall and G. T. Weaver.  Page 87.

A perspective of tree population models and structures, involving diameter, biomass and age.  (Abstract) 

E. Iglich.  Page 106.

 

SOIL-SITE PRODUCTIVITY

 

Wood as a supplemental fuel for steam generation.

G. G. Naughton and W. A. Geyer.  Page 107.

Phytosociology, biomass, productivity and nutrient budget for the tree stratum of a southern New Jersey hardwood swamp.

P. E. Reynolds, K. G. Carlson, T. W. Fromm, K. A. Gigliello, and R. J. Kaminski.  Page 123.

First year growth, biomass yield and leaf area development of four intensively-cultured Populus clones in southern Michigan.

K. W. Gottschalk and D. I. Dickmann.  Page 140.               

Biomass of species and stands of West Virginia hardwoods.

B. B. Brenneman, D. J. Frederick, W. E. Gardner, L. H. Schoenhofen, and P. L. Marsh. Page 159.

 

NUTRIENT CYCLING--HYDROLOGY

 

Water quality from relatively undisturbed forested areas in southern Illinois.

G. M. Aubertin.  Page 179.

Watershed calibration for environmental impact assessment.

C. C. Myers, G. M. Aubertin, and  C. M. Szarzynski.  Page 201.

Some effects of urea fertilization on a forested watershed in West Virginia.

J. H. Patric and D. W. Smith.  Page 210.

The effect of land use on water quality.

G. M. Aubertin and P. J. Case.  Page 228.

Hydrologic nutrient cycle relations in the Ozarks.

C. D. Settergren, D. A. Winters, and R. M. Nugent.  Page 243.

Nitrate nitrogen flux following application of ammonium nitrate to eastern Kentucky hardwoods.  (Abstract)

G. B. Coltharp, E. P. Springer, M. T. Shearer, and R. F. Wittwer. Page 256.

 

SILVICS AND SILVICULTURE

 

Classification and evaluation of forest sites for the Interior Highlands.  (Abstract)

G. W. Smalley.  Page 257.   

Regression analysis of sapling abundance in the Inner Bluegrass of Kentucky with special  reference to seed source.

J. J. N. Campbell, D. B . Richards, and L. R. F. Crowley.  Page 258.

Stand structure and species composition changes in a beech-maple stand in east Tennessee.

R. L. Hay and W. G. Martin.  Page 270.

Species replacement patterns in central Illinois white oak forests. 

R. C. Anderson and D. E. Adams.  Page 284.

SHADOS: a computer model to simulate light energy distribution in small forest openings.      

B. C. Fischer and C. Merritt.  Page 302.

How to determine whether forest fertilization pays.

N. I. Lamson and R. E. McCay.  Page 320.   

 

INTENSIVE FOREST CULTURE

 

Nutrient assimilation in trees irrigated with sewage oxidation pond effluent.

J. H. Cooley.  Page 328.

Potential for increasing fiber production through intensive culture of American sycamore in the Central Hardwoods Region.

R. F. Wittwer, M. J. Immel. and 0. W. Hinton.  Page 341.   

Response of red oaks and white oak to thinning and fertilization in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas.

D. L. Graney and P. E. Pope.  Page 357.

Accelerated growth of hardwood seedlings.

J. W. Hanover, B. W. Wood, J. W. Hart, J. C. Brissette, D. I. Dickmann, T. J. Stadt, W. A. Lemmien, and G. Kowalewski.  Page 370.

Natural improvement in black walnut stem form.

R. C. Schlesinger and C. F. Bey.  Page 389.

Effects of root regeneration and time of planting on sugar maple plantation establishment.

F. W. von Althen and D. P. Webb.  Page 401.

Growth response of black walnut and yellow-poplar to site improvement and weed control.

W. R. Byrnes, C. Merritt, and J. M. Braun.  Page 412.

Silvicultural and economic implications of thinning scarlet oak stands in southern Missouri.

R. A. Williams, W. B. Kurtz, and H. E. Garrett.  Page 425.

 

FOREST PHYSIOLOGY

 

Transpirational relationships of tulip poplar.

R. K. McConathy and S. B. McLaughlin. Page 434.

Isozyme variation in several species of oaks.

J. J. Tobolski.  Page 456.

Influence of Pisolithus tinctorius on northern red oak seedlings with nitrate fertilization. 

P. R. Beckjord, R. E. Adams, and D. W. Smith.  Page 469.

Phosphorus nutrition of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal red oak seedlings.

J. A. Fisher and G. S. Cox.  Page 480.

Effect of genotype and nutrient regime on growth and elemental concentration of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) seedlings.

P. E. Pope and R. B. Vasey.  Page 494.               

 

FOREST INSECTS AND DISEASE

 

Patterns of oak wilt mortality in Midwestern oak forests.

E. S. Menges.  Page 508.

Distribution of the white oak borer Goes tigrinus DeGeer (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in a mixed oak stand.

D. E. Donley.  Page 529.

Impact of bark and ambrosia beetles (Scolytidae) on Indiana hardwoods

M. Deyrup.  Page 540.

 

ERRATA

 

 

 

 


 

CONFERENCE  III--1980

 

SPONSORED BY:

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, COLUMBIA

 

Preface of the Third Proceedings

            The objectives of the Third Central Hardwood Forest Conference were to 1) provide a forum for the exchange of ideas pertaining to the biology of the Central Hardwood Forest Type; 2) improve communication by bringing together scientists and resource land managers who share a common interest in the Central Hardwood Region; and 3) provide, through the proceedings, an ever expanding and much needed reference on the Central Hardwoods.

 

            The texts of the papers included in this proceedings provide an overview of old and new knowledge of the Central Hardwood Forest type.  In his keynote address to this conference, Stephen G. Boyce remarked that the most effective way to use this knowledge is to "stimulate the systematic culture of forests to enhance the benefits perceived by landowners to be in their self-interest."  To do less would leave our responsibility to the landowner and the forestry profession only half-fulfilled.  It is our hope that through this conference we have, in some small way, made a contribution towards this end.

 

Harold E. Garrett

Gene S. Cox

                                                                                                     Editors

Table of Contents of the Third Proceedings

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

 

Stimulate the use of silviculture in hardwood forests.

S. G. Boyce.  Page 1.

 

FOREST SOILS AND HYDROLOGY

 

Hydrologic characteristics of an undisturbed hardwood watershed in eastern Kentucky.

G. B. Coltharp and E. P. Springer.  Page 10.

Water quality implications of forest fertilization in the Missouri Ozarks.          

A. R. Harris, D. H. Urie, R. A. McQuilkin, and I. L. Sander.  Page 21.

Hydrologic, soils and vegetation measurements for a southern New Jersey hardwood swamp.

P. E. Reynolds and W. R. Parrott, Jr.  Page 38.

Factors controlling surface flow and sediment yield following clearcutting in the oak-hickory of the Missouri Ozarks.

C. D. Settergren, R. M. Nugent, and D. M. Smith.  Page 66.

Nitrogen and cation mobility following an oak-hickory harvest in the Missouri Ozarks.

G. S. Henderson, C. D. Settergren and D. M. Smith.  Page 77.

Soil properties under pure and mixed plantings of young black walnut.

F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 83.

Revising soil-site information for better use by forest managers.

P. R. Hannah.  Page 91.

Litter dynamics of a bottomland hardwood forest in southern Illinois.

D. L. Peterson and G. L. Rolfe.  Page 103.

 

TREE PHYSIOLOGY

 

A summary of information relating to the ecophysiology of white oak (Quercus alba L.).

P. M. Dougherty, G. S. Cox and T. M. Hinckley.  Page 116.

Water stress and growth of cottonwood saplings.

R. Borchert, R. Laushman, and G. E. Glass. Page 136.

Detection of soil compaction related stress in Acer saccharum Marsh.

M. W. Williams, Jr. and J. R. Donnelly.  Page 149.

Freezing avoidance in twigs of black oak: a supercooled and desiccation resistant fraction of xylem water at low temperature and low water potential.

M. L. Carrasquilla and M. F. George.  Page 159.

Element flux in a deciduous forest exposed to air pollution.

J. R. McClenahen.  Page 167.

Nutrient levels, distribution, and variation in three bottomland hardwood species.

M. G. Messina.  Page 181.

Seasonal changes in leaf nitrogen concentration of Alnus glutinosa, A. rugosa, and  A. serrulata.

J. 0. Dawson, D. T. Funk, R. R. Fitton, and G. Z. Gertner.  Page 190.

A preliminary report on nutrient concentrations in sun and shade leaves of nine hardwood tree species in southwestern Illinois.

J. D. Jones, G. T. Weaver, and E. L. Lewis.  Page 202.

Variation in leaf thickness among southern Appalachian hardwoods.

S. B. Carpenter and N. D. Smith.  Page 210.

 

COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

 

The groundlayer of the beech-maple forest: species composition and community structure.

J. B. Levenson and M. T. Jackson.  Page 219.

Presettlement forests of the unglaciated portion of southern Illinois.  (Abstract)

L. A. Leitner and M. T. Jackson.  Page 238.

Vegetational associates and site characteristics of Kentucky coffeetree, Gymnocladus dioicus (L.)

K. Koch.  M. L. McClain and M. T. Jackson.  Page 239.

Vegetation patterns in a section of the Obed Wild and Scenic River, Cumberland County, Tennessee.

P. A. Schmalzer, C. R. Hinkle, and H. R. DeSelm.  Page 257.

Forest tree invasion and diversity on stripmines.

W. C. Ashby, N. F. Rogers, and C. A. Kolar.  Page 273.

 

MYCORRHIZAE

 

Napropamide and paraquat affect development of mycorrhizae in red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings.

P. E. Pope.  Page 282.

Soil temperature, growth and ectomycorrhizal relationships of Quercus velutina seedlings.

R. K. Dixon, G. T. Behrns, G. S. Cox,  H. E. Garrett, J. E. Roberts, P. S. Johnson, and I. L. Sander.  Page 289.

Growth of endomycorrhizal yellow-poplar seedlings in fumigated nursery soil.

J. P. Conn and R. L. Hay.  Page 298.

 

INTENSIVE FOREST CULTURE

 

First year coppice production from a 5-year-old black locust stand on surface mine spoil.

R. W. Zimmerman and S. B. Carpenter.  Page 309.

Biomass yield and cost analysis (4th year) of various tree species grown under a short rotation management scheme in eastern Kansas.

W. A. Geyer and G. C. Naughton.  Page 315.

Influence of a prescribed burn on colonizing black locust.

R. C. Anderson and L. E. Brown.  Page 330.

Biomass and nutrient accumulation in young black locust stands established by direct seeding on surface mines in eastern Kentucky.

R. A. Eigel, R. F. Wittwer, and S. B. Carpenter.  Page 337.

 

SILVICULTURE AND MANAGEMENT

 

Response of a young black walnut plantation to chemical weed control and nitrogen fertilization.

P. E. Pope, W. R. Chaney, and H. A. Holt.  Page 347.

Planting of sugar maple on abandoned farmland in southern Ontario.

F. W. von Althen and D. P. Webb.  Page 354.  

Survival and early growth of diploid white ash planted in the Central Hardwood Region.

K. E. Clausen.  Page 374.

Within-row crowding of black walnut does not reduce thinning gains.

R. C. Schlesinger. Page 384.   

Economic efficiency of two pruning heights in black walnut.

L. H. Foster and F. H. Kung. Page 390.

Value growth rates from overwood trees in the irregular shelterwood method in southern Indiana upland hardwoods.

B. C. Fischer, R. B. Standiford, and J. C. Callahan.  Page 401.

Fifteen year results of three harvesting methods on composition and development of regeneration in southern Indiana upland hardwoods.

R. B. Standiford and B. C. Fischer.  Page 408.

Predicting growth of individual stems within northern red oak sprout clumps.

P. S. Johnson and R. Rogers.  Page 420.

Hardwood growth and yield on various sites in the southeastern United States.

W. E. Gardner, D. J. Frederick, and R. C. Kellison.  Page 440.

Effect of fertilization on four species in mature Appalachian hardwood stands.

N. I. Lamson. Page 449.

 

FOREST INSECTS

 

Number, size, and location of red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus Haldeman, attack sites on red oaks in Indiana.

D. E. Donley.  Page 458.


CONFERENCE  IV--1982

 

SPONSORED BY:

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

 

Preface of the Fourth Proceedings

 

            In its development by the editors of the first proceedings, the Central Hardwood Forest Conference was designed to provide a forum for the increased communication and exchange of ideas between scientists and land managers operating in the Central Hardwood Forest Region.  Such a forum, of course, relies upon a solid understanding of the biology of the region.  Thus, an additional objective of the conference was to provide a centralized mechanism for the exchange of new findings among scientists working in the Central Hardwood Forest Region.  It is always hoped that the formal and informal exchanges provided by a conference will contribute to the design of new research programs leading to a greater understanding.  These have been the objectives of the second and third conferences and remain the objectives of the Fourth Central Hardwood Forest Conference. 

 

            Increased demands upon resources of the Central Hardwood Forest Region require that appropriate management schemes be based upon a firm understanding of the biological foundations of the forest type.  It is to be hoped that these and future proceedings will contribute to the wise and sustained utilization of these resources.

 

                                                                                                Robert N. Muller

                                                                                                 Editor

 

 

Table of Contents of the Fourth Proceedings

 

SILVICULTURE

 

The long-term effects of site improvement and early weed control on yellow-poplar plantations.

R. A. McLaughlin, P. E. Pope and W. R. Byrnes.  Page 1.

Underplanting yellow-poplar in a shortleaf pine plantation in southern Illinois.

A. R. Gilmore, G. L. Rolfe, and L. E. Arnold.  Page 19.

The silvicultural and economic feasibility of thinning mixed stands of oak on a site index of 70 in south Missouri.

J. F. Durham, W. B. Kurtz, and H. E. Garrett.  Page 25.

Logging damage to dominant and codominant residual stems in thinned West Virginia cherry-maple stands.

N. I. Lamson and G. W. Miller.  Page 32.

Response of American sycamore specific gravity to intensive culture.

J. R. Olson and R. F. Wittwer.  Page 39.

Effect of timber stand improvement on population levels of the red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus Haldeman (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

D. E. Donley.  Page 47.

     

FERTILIZATION

 

Nitrogen fertilization and thinning of oak stands in the Ozarks: effects on soil nitrogen, growth, and nitrogen uptake of understory vegetation.

C. S. Snyder, D. L. Graney, and L. F. Thompson.  Page 51.

Response of red oaks and white oak to thinning and fertilization in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas: 7-year results.

D. L. Graney.  Page 64.

Fertilization of oaks in the Missouri Ozarks.

R. A. McQuilkin.  Page 79.

Response of red maple saplings to fertilization and irrigation on a dry site: preliminary results.

C. H. Pham.  Page 93.

Effects of fertilization and aspect on leaf biomass, leaf size, and leaf area index in central Appalachian hardwood stands.

J. N. Kochenderfer and G. W. Wendel.  Page 102.

 

BIOMASS  AND  PRODUCTIVITY

 

Effect of harvest season and spacing on coppiced sweetgum biomass yields.

B. G. McCutchan and E. L. Prewitt.  Page 113.

Survival and growth of planted red oak and white ash as affected by residual overstory density, stock size, and deer browsing.

K. W. Gottschalk and D. A. Marquis.  Page 125.

Growth and yield of upland hardwoods in southern Indiana.

J. D. Schroering and B. C. Fischer.  Page 141.

Landtype and seed source affect 20-year growth of planted yellow-poplar on the Cumberland            Plateau in Tennessee.

G. W. Smalley.  Page 158.

A preliminary comparison of three tree growth models for Central States species.

S. R. Shifley.  Page 169.

Is "COPPICE" a good predictor of red oak sprout growth?

R. Rogers and P. S. Johnson.  Page 185.

Growth of white oak (Quercus alba L.) in relation to soil and site properties in eastern Kentucky.

C. W. Honeycutt, R. L. Blevins, and R. F. Wittwer.  Page 193.

Site index of yellow-poplar in relation to soil and topography in eastern Kentucky.

R. A. Eigel, R. L. Blevins, R. F. Wittwer, and C. J. Liu.  Page 207.

A test of the budget method: a refined approach to the measurement of fine root turnover.

J. D. Joslin and G. S. Henderson.  Page 220.

Leguminous cover crops can suppress weeds and accelerate growth of black walnut seedlings in intensively cultured plantations.

J. W. Van Sambeek and W. J. Rietveld.  Page 229.

     

NUTRIENT  CYCLING  AND  HYDROLOGY

 

Biomass yields and nutrient removal in short rotation black locust plantations.

P. E. Pope and C. P. Anderson.  Page 244.

Nodulation of Frankia of Alnus glutinosa seeded in soil from different topographic positions on an Illinois spoil bank.

J. 0. Dawson, T. W. Christensen, and R. G. Timmons.  Page 257.

Soil nitrogen patterns around Alnus glutinosa in mixed plantation with hybrid Populus.

J. 0. Dawson, P. J. Dzialowy, G. Z. Gertner, and E. A. Hansen.  Page 263.

Organic matter and nitrogen content of a Central Hardwood forest in Connecticut.

L. M. Tritton, C. W. Martin, J. W. Hornbeck, R. S. Pierce, and C. A. Federer.  Page 271.

Standing crop nutrient biomass for two evergreen bottomland hardwood forests.

P. E. Reynolds.  Page 285.

Surface litter, soil organic matter, and the chemistry of mineral soil and foliar tissue: landscape patterns in forests located on mountainous terrain in West Virginia.

G. E. Lang and K. A. Orndorff.  Page 303.

Nutrient relationships in two small West Virginia watersheds.

P. A. Sallese, J. A. Coates, and R. R. Hicks, Jr.  Page 322.

Hydrologic characteristics of mixed hardwood watersheds in the Boston Mountains.

T. L. Rogerson and E. R. Lawson.  Page 344.

Hydrology of a south-central Missouri cedar glade.

J. A. Gates, C. D. Settergren, G. S. Henderson, and J. J. Krstansky.  Page 350.

 

COMMUNITY  ECOLOGY

 

Species diversity and site position at Savage Gulf, Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee.

H. R. DeSelm and M. D. Sherman.  Page 356.

Natural disturbance by tree falls in old-growth mixed mesophytic forest: Lilley Cornett Woods, Kentucky.

W. H. Romme and William H. Martin.  Page 367. 

Caloric content estimation and distribution in seven bottomland hardwood tree species growing in natural stands in the South.

S. T. Gower, D. J. Frederick, and A. Clark.  Page 384.


CONFERENCE  V--1985

 

SPONSORED BY

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN &

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS

 

Preface of the Fifth Proceedings

 

            These proceedings are from the fifth in a series of biennial conferences begun in 1976 at Southern Illinois University.  Other past conferences have been sponsored by the Forestry Departments of Purdue University, The University of Missouri, and the University of Kentucky.  The purpose of these conferences remains the same: to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas among scientists and forest managers and to facilitate coordinated research in the Central Hardwood Forest Region.  The Central Hardwood Forest is an ecological entity dominated by winter deciduous oak and hickory trees in eastern North America.  Rather than draw boundaries, the organizers of the conference have entertained contributions of papers not only from the Ohio River Valley, which forms the heart of this region, but also from neighboring regions in the eastern United States and Canada with similar hardwood forests.  A variety of research work with a bearing on understanding and managing Central Hardwood forests has been reported in this and past proceedings.

 

            New technologies for using hardwoods, increased exports of hardwood timber ' and other factors outlined in the keynote paper of this conference indicate that the time is coming when this regional forest resource may increase in economic importance.  Thus, a biological basis for managing these forests may become increasingly critical.  Additionally, the contributions of this resource in providing clean water, recreational opportunities, wildlife habitat, soil stabilization, and other benefits in an increasingly developed landscape in the eastern United States indicate the importance of our understanding hardwood forests.  We hope that this and future conferences in the

series continue to broaden our biological understanding of this valuable forest ecosystem.

 

                                                                                                Jeffrey O. Dawson

                                                                                                Kimberly A. Majerus

                                                                                                Editors

 

 

Table of Contents of the Fifth Proceedings

 

KEYNOTE PAPER

 

Future research on Central Hardwoods.

R. E. Buckman and N. E. Loftus, Jr.  Page 1.

 

SILVICULTURE

 

Growth of oak, ash, and cherry reproduction following overstory thinning of upland hardwood stands in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas.

D. L. Graney and T. L. Rogerson.  Page 4.

Species composition of young Central Hardwood stands that develop after clearcutting.

D. E. Hilt.  Page 11.

Growth and nutrition of planted black walnut in response to several cultural treatments.

F. Ponder, Jr. and D. M. Baines.  Page 15.

Thinning a coppice regenerated oak-hickory stand: thirty years of growth development.

R. J. Mitchell, R. A. Musbach, K. Lowell, H. E. Garrett, and G. S. Cox.  Page 19.

Thinning of young natural hardwood regeneration in southeastern West Virginia.

C. H. Pham.  Page 25.

Northern red oak and white oak planting in a commercial clearcut with chemical weed control.

J. R. Seifert and B. C. Fischer.  Page 35.

Impact of chemical site preparation on survival and growth of five hardwood species.

G.M. Wright.  Page 40.

Preemergence herbicide performance on forest soil.

A. W. Sam, T. W. Bowersox, and L. H. McCormick.  Page 47.

 

FERTILIZATION

 

Response of young black cherry to thinning and fertilization.

L. R. Auchmoody.  Page 53.

Release and fertilization of black walnut in natural stands.

J. W. Stringer and R. F. Wittwer.  Page 62.

Weed control and fertilization aid sweetgum plantation establishment.

E. A. Nelson.  Page 68.

Nitrogen sources and fertilizer rates affect growth of hybrid poplar.

E. A. Hansen and D. N. Tolsted.  Page 71.

Measuring fertilizer response in mixed species hardwood stands.

J. A. Stanturf and E. L. Stone, Jr.  Page 78.

 

STEM AND STAND MEASUREMENTS

 

Cost effective sampling for specific gravity.

G. Z. Gertner and J. J. Jokela.  Page 90.

Quality dynamics in young black walnut trees.

R. C. Schlesinger and D. M. Baines.  Page 94.

Projection of stem quality distribution in sugar maple stands.

D. D. Reed, E. A. Jones, R. A. Leary, and G. W. Lyon.  Page 100.

Rule thinning: a field method for meeting stocking goals in oak stands.

R. Rogers and P. S. Johnson.  Page 106.

Growth relationships for upland hardwood sawtimber stands in Indiana.

B. C. Fischer and S. A. Kershaw, Jr.  Page 111.

Production of unmanaged bottomland hardwoods in Arkansas.

B. Zeide.  Page 118.

                     

FOREST ECOLOGY

 

Interrelationships among soil nutrient availability, N and P cycling, and N and P use efficiency in four hardwood forest stands.

R. E. J. Boerner.  Page 125.

Organic matter and nutrient content of the forest floor of oak-hickory forests in southwestern Illinois.

J. C. Luvall, and G. T. Weaver.  Page 138.

Tree spatial patterns in an old-growth forest in east-central Indiana           

D. J. Leopold, G. R. Parker, and J. S. Ward.  Page 151.

Silvics of loblolly-bay, Cordonia lasianthus.

C. A. Gresham and D. J. Lipscomb.  Page 165.

Changes in upland oak-hickory forests of central Missouri: 1968-1982.

T. A. Nigh, S. G. Pallardy, and H. E. Garrett.  Page 170.

Woody vegetation of Baber Woods: composition and change since 1965.

J. A. Newman and J. E. Ebinger.  Page 178.

Origin of oak stands on the Springfield Plain: a lesson on oak regeneration.

J. J. Jokela and R. A Sawtelle.  Page 181.

Effects of shading on growth and development of northern red oak, black oak, black cherry, and red maple seedlings I: height, diameter, and root/shoot ratio.

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 189.

 

FLOODPLAIN FORESTS AND FOREST HYDROLOGY

 

Wetland invertebrates distribution in bottomland hardwoods as influenced by forest type and flooding regime.

D. L. Batema, G. S. Henderson, and L. H. Fredrickson.  Page 196.

Response of tree growth to changes in flooding regime in a mixed hardwood bottomland forest in southern Illinois.

S. Brown.  Page 203.

Hydrologic responses to silvicultural practices in pine-hardwood stands in the Ouachita Mountains.

T. L.  Rogerson.  Page 209.

Water quality of stormflows from hardwood forested catchments in the Boston Mountains.

E. R. Lawson, T. L. Rogerson, and L. H. Hileman.  Page 215.

 

TREE PHYSIOLOGY AND SYMBIOSIS

 

Physical aspects of freezing in black oak acorns.

S. R. Boese, M. F. George, R. J. Mitchell, U. Martin, and R. A. McQuilkin.  Page 222.

Techniques of rooting juvenile softwood cuttings of northern red oak.

J. G. Isebrands and T. R. Crow.  Page 228.

Culture of ovules containing immature embryos of eastern cottonwood in vitro.

M. A. Savka, R. M. Skirvin, J. J. Jokela, and J. 0. Dawson.  Page 234.   

Stimulation of green ash growth by Glomus etunicatum and phosphorus fertilization.

C. P. Andersen, R. K. Dixon, and E. I. Sucoff.  Page 239.

Association of Robinia pseudoacacia and Rhizobium: potential nitrogen accretion.

R. J. Reinsvold and P. E. Pope.  Page 245

Temporal and spatial changes in soil nitrogen concentration around Alnus glutinosa stressed by interplanted hybrid poplar.

J. 0. Dawson and G. Z. Gertner.  Page 251.

Actinorhizal species as nurse crops for black walnut.

J. W. Van Sambeek, R. C. Schlesinger, Felix Ponder, Jr., and W. J. Rietveld.  Page 257.

Effects of soil compaction on root growth characteristics of yellow-poplar and sweetgum seedlings.

G. L. Simmons and P. E. Pope.  Page 264.   

Allelopathic inhibition of northern red oak by interrupted fern and goldenrod.

P. J. Hanson and R. K. Dixon.  Page 269.

     

INSECTS AND DISEASES

 

Oak sawtimber losses in stands defoliated by gypsy moth.

D. E. Donley and D. L. Feicht.  Page 275.

Pilot test of red oak borer silvicultural control in commercial forest stands.

D. L. Feicht and R. Acciavatti.  Page 280.

Companion planting of black walnut with autumn olive to control Mycosphaerella leaf spot of walnut.K. J. Kessler, Jr.  Page 285.

     

GENETICS

 

Early growth and flowering of Alnus glutinosa provenances in southern Illinois.

K. E. Clausen.  Page 289.   

A method for selection of seed sources and planting location for black walnut in the Central States.

G. D. Smith and F. H. Kung.  Page 296.


 

CONFERENCE VI--1987

 

SPONSORED BY:

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE,

SOUTHERN FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, &

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS

 

Foreword of the Sixth Proceedings

 

            As the pressures from urban sprawl, highway development, agriculture, resort development, industrialization and the designation of wilderness and special-use lands increase, the amount of forested land manageable for multiple purposes correspondingly decreases.  There is little doubt that this problem will intensify in the Central Hardwood Region, a region which seems destined to become more populated, more urbanized and more industrialized, even within our immediate planning horizons.  How should foresters, whose task it is to husband the total forest resource, react to these rapidly changing conditions? Obviously, they must become better informed to find those answers; one way to become better informed is to personally communicate and interact with co-workers.

 

            Such was the setting for the Sixth Central Hardwood Forest Conference.  The objectives of the Conference were (1) to draw attention to the Central Hardwood Region, (2) to provide a forum where people with ideas might interact, and (3) to facilitate coordinated regional research.  The extent to which we have been successful will only be proven by time.  This conference alone will not provide all of the answers that we need and neither will a dozen more.  It will however, add to our total knowledge and make us more able to understand the complex and intriguing nature of the forest environments in which we live.  We can only hope that our ability to cope with the changes we can expect in the future will not be exceeded by the impetus which such changes have already gained.

 

            As organizers of a Conference that is now history, we respectfully suggest that the next Conference devote a substantial part of the program to forest change due to the human element of the environment and to the needs of people for amenities of hardwood forests other than wood.  Perhaps our Conference became more of a forestry conference, rather than a forest conference which should consider much of the total forest resource and its uses. No matter how well we understand the silviculture, physiology, taxonomy, ecology, and other technical aspects of forests, people will ultimately help determine the extent and type of uses for which our forests will be managed.  If we fail to include them in our management assessment, we will. most certainly lose our preferred status as forest managers.

 

                                                                                                Ronald L. Hay

                                                                                                Frank W. Woods

                                                                                                Hal R. DeSelm

                                                                                                Editors

 

Table of Contents of the Sixth Proceedings

 

KEYNOTE

 

Future of the hardwood forest:  some problems with declines and air quality.

W. H. Smith.  Page 3.

 

GENERAL SESSION OF INVITED PAPERS

 

What happened to site-specific, goal-oriented silvicultural prescriptions?

L. S. Minckler.  Page 17.

Clearcutting in upland hardwoods: a panacea or an anathema?

C. E. McGee.  Page 21.

Recreation:  the multiple use for Central Hardwood forests.

W. E. Hammitt.  Page 31.

 

REGENERATION BY PLANTING

 

Herbaceous communities reduce the juvenile growth of northern red oak, white ash, yellow-poplar, but not white pine.

T. W. Bowersox and L. H. McCormick.  Page 39.

Growth of containerized yellow-poplar as affected by different vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal mycobionts.

V. L. Ford and R. L. Hay.  Page 45.

A trial of herbicide treatments for enrichment plantings of cherrybark oak.

J. H. Miller and E. C. Burkhardt.  Page 53.

Containerization of white and red oak seedlings.

J. A. Mullins, Jr. and E. R. Buckner.  Page 59.

Effect of weed control on early growth and survival of planted black walnut in a forest clearcut.

F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 63.

Comparison of planting methods for nursery- and container-grown black walnut seedlings.

J. W. Van Sambeek, R. D. Williams, and J. W. Hanover.  Page 69.

Site preparation and weed control in hardwood afforestation in Ontario.

F. W. von Althen.  Page 75.

 

NATURAL REGENERATION

 

Group shelterwood system for regenerating oak in eastern Iowa.

K. D. Coder, P. H. Wray, and D. W. Countryman.  Page 83.

Burning in southern Appalachian logging slash--effects on residual vegetation and regrowth.

S. J. Danielovich, D. H. Van Lear, S. K. Cox, and M. K. Augspurger.  Page 91.

Effects of shading on growth and development of northern red oak, black oak, black cherry, and red maple seedlings II: biomass partitioning and prediction.

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 99.

Oak-hickory regeneration in eastern Kentucky.

D. B. Hill.  Page 111.

Revegetation after whole-tree clearcutting of hardwoods in Connecticut.

C. W. Martin, L. M. Tritton, and J. W. Hornbeck.  Page 119.

Hardwood regenerative response to clearcutting and edge effects in an oak-dominated forest of central Indiana.

G. R. Parker and P. T. Sherwood.  Page 127.

 

SILVICULTURE/MANAGEMENT

 

Survival patterns of understory woody species in a pine-hardwood forest during 28 years without timber management.

M. D. Cain.  Page 141.

A financial analysis of three upland oak sites in southern Illinois.

G. E. Campbell and R. W. Koening.  Page 149.

Using economic factors in managing hardwoods for high quality.

T. J. Cayen and O. F. Hall.  Page 159.

Effects of crop tree thinning and pruning on log and lumber quality of scarlet and black oak stands.

J. P. Dwyer, W. B. Kurtz, and K. E. Lowell.  Page 169.

Effects of precommercial thinning on diameter growth in young Central Hardwood stands.

D. E. Hilt and M. E. Dale.  Page 179.

Impacts of harvesting bottomland hardwoods.

R. Lea.  Page 189.

Ecological classification system: information and economics.

L. A. Leefers, D. T. Cleland, and J. B. Hart.  Page 195.

Thinning young, natural hardwood regeneration with broadcast herbicide application.

C. H. Pham.  Page 205.

Herbicidal control of understory sugar maple in Missouri’s oak-hickory forests.

M. W. Thomas, H. E. Garrett, S. G. Pallardy, and R. J. Mitchell.  Page 217.

 

 

SITE RELATIONS/BIOMASS/NUTRIENT ACCUMULATION

 

Alteration of dry weight distribution and P concentration by soil temperature in green ash seedlings.

C. P. Anderson, E. I. Sucoff, and R. K. Dixon.  Page 225.

Elemental analysis of red oak and loblolly pine growing near an inactive chromium smelter.

L. J. Bowers and J. H. Melhuish, Jr.  Page 231.

Site, spacing, tree portion, and species influence ash and extractives content of five juvenile hardwoods.

P. Chow, G. L. Rolfe, W. K. Motter, and K. A. Majerus.  Page 247.

Variation in the capacity of black alder to nodulate in central Illinois soils.

J. O. Dawson and M. T. Klemp.  Page 255.

Nutritive quality of deer browse related to soil fertility in oak-hickory forest habitat.

K. T. Fuller and C. C. Amundsen.  Page 261.

Carbon budgets of Quercus rubra L. seedlings at selected stages of growth: influence of light.

P. J. Hanson, J. G. Isebrands, and R. E. Dickson.  Page 269.

Growth patterns of red oak, and red and sugar maple relative to atmospheric deposition.

J. W. Hornbeck.  Page 277.

Rationale for a multifactor forest site classification system for the southern Appalachians.

W. H. McNab.  Page 283.

Influence of oaks on the accumulation of calcium in forests.

G. T. Weaver and J. D. Jones.  Page 295.

 

STAND DYNAMICS/STAND STRUCTURE

 

Replacement of oak-chestnut forests in the Great Smoky Mountains.

E. Arends and J. F. McCormick.  Page 305.

Structure and composition of the old-growth forests of Hamilton County, Ohio, and environs.

W. S. Bryant.  Page 317.

Gradients of tree species composition in the Central Hardwood Region.

J. J. N. Campbell.  Page 325.

Hardwood succession in the Iowa Driftless Area.

K. D. Coder.  Page 347.

The woody vegetation of Little Black Slough: an undisturbed upland swamp forest in southern Illinois.

P. A. Robertson.  Page 353.

Fifty-five years of association and diversity dynamics in an old-growth forest in Indiana: Davis-Purdue Research Forest 1926-1981.

J. S. Ward and G. R. Parker.  Page 369.

Forest communities and their relationships with landtypes on the western Highland Rim of Tennessee.

R. M. Wheat, Jr. and R. W. Dimmick.  Page 377.

 

FOREST PRODUCTS

 

Log, lumber, and veneer hardwood export markets.

P. A. Araman and B. G. Hansen.  Page 387.

Timber supply in southwest Virginia.

S. E. Clements.  Page 395.

The changing hardwood lumber market.

W. G. Luppold.  Page 401.

Effect of some processing variables on properties of mixed-hardwood strandboard.

P. M. Winistorfer and D. DiCarlo.  Page 409.

 

FOREST PROTECTION

 

Effect of Stelidota octomaculata (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) on germinating acorns under laboratory conditions.

J. R. Galford.  Page 419.

Mortality following gypsy moth defoliations in the central Appalachians.

R. R. Hicks, Jr. and D. E. Fosbroke.  Page 423.

Oak mortality in the Missouri Ozarks.

J. R. Law and J. D. Gott.  Page 427.

Influence of family genotype and soil pH on growth and chlorosis of pin oak seedlings.

J. J. Tobolski.  Page 437.

 

FOREST MEASUREMENTS

 

Simulation of subsampling selection rules for hardwood tree heights.

E. J. Green and C. T. Scott.  Page 443.

Evaluation of a common volume equation for scarlet oak and black oak in the Missouri Ozarks.

K. E. Lowell, J. D. Dwyer, and W. B. Kurtz.  Page 449.

Forest statistics and information needs in the Central Hardwood Region.

J. S. Spencer, Jr. and J. T. Bones.  Page 457. 

 

FOREST HYDROLOGY

 

Nutrient flux on undisturbed hardwood watersheds in eastern Kentucky.

G. B. Coltharp and R. C. Albright.  Page 469.

Changes in nutrient outputs in streamflow after harvesting central hardwoods.

J. W. Hornbeck, C. W. Martin, L. M. Tritton, R. S. Pierce, and R. B. Smith.  Page 479.

Changes in aboveground biomass and nutrient content on Walker Branch watershed from 1967 to 1983.

D. W. Johnson, G. S. Henderson, and W. F. Harris.  Page 487.

Sediment yield as a function of land use in central Appalachian forests.

J. N. Kochenderfer, J. D. Helvey, and G. W. Wendel.  Page 497.

Hydrograph responses to timber harvesting in the Missouri Ozarks.

C. D. Settergren and J. J. Krstansky.  Page 503.

 

POSTER SUMMARIES

 

Silvicultural guidelines for forest stands threatened by the gypsy moth.

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 509.   

Potential of beech and striped maple to dominate regeneration on eastern hardwood sites.

P. R. Hannah.  Page 511.

Uses, types, and availability of growth and yield models for the Central Hardwood Region.

D. E. Hilt, R. M. Teck, and T. L. Gullett.  Page 513.

Reforestation of beaver-kill sites with plant hardwoods.

A. E. Houston, R. Henry, and E. R. Buckner.  Page 515.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency wildlife-forest management program.

T. W. Hughes.  Page 517.

Morphological responses of northern red oak and yellow-poplar to components of plant interference.

T. E. Kolb and K. C. Steiner.  Page 519.

A stand table projection model for natural hardwood stands in Red River bottoms.

D. L. Mengel.  Page 521.

Vegetation disturbance history in Great Smoky Mountains prior to acquisition by the National Park Service.

C. Pyle.  Page 523.

Oak mortality in eastern Kentucky.

J. W. Stringer, T. W. Kimmerer, and J. C. Overstreet.  Page 525.

 


 

CONFERENCE VII--1989

 

SPONSORED BY:

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AT CARBONDALE &

NORTH CENTRAL FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, ST. PAUL, MN

 

NCFES General Technical Report NC-132

 

Preface of the Seventh Proceedings

           

            The three primary objectives of the Central Hardwood Forest Conference are: (1) to provide identity to the Central Hardwood Forest Region as an entity, (2) to provide a communicative forum for scientists with a common interest in the central hardwoods, and (3) to coordinate regional research.

 

            Although most Conferences have had a definite ecological and/or traditional forestry orientation, authors of the Foreword to the Sixth Proceedings (1987) suggested that the Seventh Conference (i.e., the present one) "devote a substantial part of the program to forest change due to the human element of the environment and to the needs of people for amenities of hardwood forests other than wood".  These authors also suggested that if we, as forest managers, fail to include the human element in land management assessment we will most likely lose the confidence of the lay public.  Partially in response to this type of concern, a panel discussion by policy level personnel in the Central Hardwood Region was included on the first morning of this conference to discuss research management priorities.

 

            The Seventh Central Hardwood Forest Conference was held on the campus of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL, also the site for the first Central Hardwood Forest Conference.  Attendance at these conferences has steadily increased, a measure of the quality of the research results, as well as acceptance of the need for this type of forum.  We wish the hosts of the Eighth Conference at least equal success.

 

                                                       George Rink

                                                       Carl A. Budelski

                                                       Editors

 

Table of Contents of the Seventh Proceedings

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

 

Central hardwoods: what we know, where do we go.

F. B. Clark.  Page 1.

 

RESEARCH PRIORITIES FOR CENTRAL HARDWOODS

 

Central Hardwood Forest research: budgets, priorities, challenges.

R. D. Lindmark.  Page 7.

Forestry research for Illinois: recommendations of the Illinois Commission on Forestry Development.

G. L. Rolfe.  Page 11.

Central Hardwood research priorities as viewed by a state forester.

A. S. Mickelson.  Page 16.

 

GENERAL SESSION: INVITED PAPERS

 

A dozen recommendations for managing hardwood forest profitably.

J. M. Vasievich.  Page 18.

Some perspectives on oak decline in the 8Os.

K. J. Kessler, Jr.  Page 25.

Landscape ecology: an eclectic science for the times.

T. R. Crow.  Page 30.

 

 

SILVICULTURE/MANAGEMENT

 

Intensive group selection silviculture in central hardwoods after 40 years.

L. S. Minckler. Page 35.

The effect of site and age on tree regeneration in young upland hardwood clearcuts.

D. W. George and B. C. Fischer.  Page 40.

The effects of understory removal in thinned upland oak stands--22-year results.

D. E. Hilt, D. L. Sonderman, and E. D. Rast.  Page 48.

Early thinning can improve your stand of coppice-regenerated oak.

K. E. Lowell, H. E. Garrett, and R. J. Mitchell.  Page 53.

The need to improve models of individual tree mortality.

G. Z. Gertner.  Page 59.

Competitive ability and growth allocation of planted northern red oak and yellow-poplar seedlings.

T. E. Kolb and K. C. Steiner.  Page 62.

 

FOREST PROTECTION

 

Regeneration in oak stands following gypsy moth defoliations.

D. Allen and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 67.

Tree mortality following gypsy moth defoliation in southwestern Pennsylvania.

D. E. Fosbroke and R. R. Hicks, Jr.  Page 74.

Susceptibility of sugar maple and oak to eleven foliar-applied herbicides.

H. E. Garrett, M. W. Thomas, and S. G. Pallardy.  Page 81.

Direct control of insect defoliation in oak stands is economically feasible in preventing timber value loss.

R. R. Hicks, Jr., K. S. Riddle, and S. M. Brock.  Page 86.

Site factors and stand conditions associated with oak decline in southern upland hardwood forests.

D. A. Starkey and S. W. Oak.  Page 95.

A five year record of change for a declining scarlet oak stand in the Missouri Ozarks.

L. J. Johnson and J. R. Law.  Page 103.

 

RHIZOSPHERE RELATIONS

 

Revitalizing slow-growth black walnut plantings.

J. W. Van Sambeek, R. C. Schlesinger, P. L. Roth, and I. Bocoum.  Page 108.

The effect of root pruning treatments on red oak seedling root growth capacity.

C. J. Barden and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 115.

Soil nitrogen mineralization under black walnut interplanted with autumn-olive or black alder.

M. W. Paschke, J. 0. Dawson, and M. B. David.  Page 120.

The importance of below ground interactions for hardwood growth.

F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 129.

Seasonal changes in nitrogen fixation activity of European black alder and Russian olive.

S. F. Zitzer, J. 0. Dawson, and G. Z. Gertner.  Page 134.

Inoculation of northern red oak seedlings with the fungal symbiont Suillus luteus in a Michigan nursery.

R. K. Dixon.  Page 141.

 

ARTIFICIAL REGENERATION

 

Improved micropropagation of white ash (Fraxinus americana L.).

N. E. Navarrete, J. W. Van Sambeek, J. E. Preece, and G. R. Gaffney.  Page 146.

Survival and development of underplanted northern red oak seedlings: 6-year results.

R. K. Myers, B. C. Fischer, and G. M. Wright.  Page 150.

Effects of shade and herbaceous vegetation on first-year germination and growth of direct-seeded northern red oak, white ash, white pine and yellow-poplar.

T. E. Kolb, T. W. Bowersox, L. H. McCormick, and K. C. Steiner.  Page 156.

Relating black walnut planting stock quality to field performance.

W. J. Rietveld and J. W. Van Sambeek.  Page 162.

Early height growth increased in black walnut-silver maple intermixtures.

F. W. von Althen.  Page 170.

Hormone fluctuations during stratification and germination of black walnut seed.

P. W. Somers, J. W. Van Sambeek, and G. R. Gaffney.  Page 175.

Oak regeneration by clearcutting after a series of partial cuts.

J. 0. Dawson, J. McCarthy, J. A. Roush, and D. M. Stenger.  Page 181.

 

FOREST UTILIZATION

 

Impact of product mix and markets on the economic feasibility of hardwood thinning.

J. E. Baumgras and C. B. LeDoux.  Page 185.

Contemporary logging technology for harvesting young central hardwoods.

C. B. LeDoux and J. E. Baumgras.  Page 190.

Verification of tree grading algorithms with a hypothetical hardwood forest.

C. J. Liu, Jeffrey W. Stringer, and D. J. McLaren.  Page 196.

Current trends in regional hardwood lumber production and timber usage.

W. G. Luppold and G. P. Demsey.  Page 201.

Economic potential of increased timber availability in north-central Pennsylvania.

C. H. Strauss.  Page 207.

The ecology of forest recreation: a framework for research in Central Hardwood forests.

H. W. Schroeder.  Page 217.

Implementing group selection in Appalachian hardwoods using economic guidelines.

B. A. Boucher and O. F. Hall.  Page 221.

 

STAND DYNAMICS/STAND STRUCTURE

 

Historical evidence of forest composition in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky.

J. J. N. Campbell.  Page 231.

Composition and structure of an old-growth oak-hickory forest in southern Michigan over 20 years.

W. E. Hammitt and B. V. Barnes.  Page 247.

Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) communities in the Kentucky River gorge area of the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky.

W. S. Bryant.  Page 254.

Dynamics of the sugar maple component of a white oak-yellow-poplar community.

R. C. Schlesinger.  Page 262.

Long-term effects of a 1932 surface fire on stand structure in a Connecticut mixed hardwood forest.

J. S. Ward and G. R. Stephens.  Page 267.

 

HYDROLOGY

 

Canopy interactions with atmospheric deposition at three hardwood forest sites.

D. R. DeWalle, W. E. Sharpe, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 274.

Effects of forest fertilization on selected ion concentrations in central Appalachian streams.

J. D. Helvey, J. N. Kochenderfer, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 278.

Hydrologic impacts of mechanized site preparation in the central Appalachians.

J. N. Kochenderfer and J. D. Helvey.  Page 283.

Nutrient inputs and pools in upland and bottomland forests of Allerton Park, Illinois.

M. B. David.  Page 290.

 

POSTER ABSTRACTS AND SUMMARIES

 

Effects of previous stand management on mortality following gypsy moth defoliation. (Abstract)

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 296.

A key for hardwood tree grading.  (Summary)

J. W. Stringer, D. J. McClaren, and C. J. Liu.  Page 297.

Classification and evaluation of the Natchez Trace State Forest, State Resort Park, and Wildlife Management Area for timber and wildlife habitat.  (Abstract)

G. W. Smalley, K. S. Arney, L. A. Sharber, and H. W. Applegate.  Page 298.

A multifactor classification of upland hardwood forest ecosystems of the Kickapoo River watershed, southwestern Wisconsin.  (Abstract)

D. M. Hix, C. G. Lorimer, and R. P. Guries.  Page 299.

Effects of understory control on survival and vigor of red oak seedlings beneath a shelterwood.            (Summary)

D. M. Pubanz, C. G. Lorimer, and R. P. Guries.  Page 300.

Comparative growth and physiology of stem-pruned and unpruned northern red oak. (Summary)

E. L. Kruger and P. B. Reich.  Page 302.


CONFERENCE VIII--1991

 

SPONSORED BY

THE PENNSYLVANICA STATE UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY PARK,

NORTHEASTERN FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, RADNOR, PA, &

BUREAU OF FORESTRY,

PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

 

NEFES General Technical Report NE-148

 

Foreword of the Eighth Proceedings

 

            This conference is the eighth in a series of biennial meetings that began in 1976 at Southern Illinois University.  Other conferences have been hosted by Purdue University, University of Missouri, University of Kentucky, University of Illinois, and University of Tennessee.  The purpose of these conferences has remained the same: to provide a forum for the exchange of information concerning the central hardwoods and to engender coordination among forest scientists in the Central Hardwood Region.  This purpose is evidently well-served: the last several conferences have each attracted some 45 to 65 program contributions, and the audiences have been correspondingly large.

 

            Previous organizers have refrained from drawing precise boundaries around the "Central Hardwood Region." We prefer to continue that policy on the grounds that to do otherwise might preclude some very worthwhile participation.  Thus, while the principal focus has remained on the oak resource for reasons that are obvious, the ecological scope has broadened from oak-hickory (in the early meetings) to Appalachian oak (Knoxville and State College) and mesophytic forests.  With a few exceptions, the commercially significant species are similar for all these forest types, and advancements in knowledge are of general interest.

 

 

            But the Central Hardwood Region is not merely a collection of similar forest types.  It also has historical, demographic, political, and economic characteristics that tend to distinguish it from other forest regions of the United States.  For example, the population is heavily rural and agricultural, primary wood markets tend to be diffuse and unorganized, wilderness values and endangered species have generally not been overriding issues, and a relatively minor proportion of the forest land is controlled by public agencies or corporate ownerships.  These and related conditions play critical roles in the practice of forestry in this region, and in the aggregate they emphasize its distinction from other regions; but no single one is necessarily unique to the central hardwoods.  For these reasons, the characteristics of nonindustrial private forest land owners in Massachusetts might be just as relevant to the Central Hardwood Region as regeneration methods for white oak in Indiana.

 

            Since these proceedings are being published in advance, we have no way of judging the ultimate success of the upcoming Eighth Conference.  Of course, our earnest hope is that this meeting shall sustain the excellent reputation of the series.  We believe this hope is encouraged by the quality of the papers in these proceedings.

 

                                                                                                Larry H. McCormick

                                                                                                Kurt W. Gottschalk

                                                                                                Editors

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents of the Eighth Proceedings

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

 

Management of hardwood forests in the Mid-Atlantic region: past, present and future. (Abstract)

David A. Marquis.  Page 1.

Central Hardwood Forest resources: a social science perspective.

John F. Dwyer, Herbert W. Schroeder, and Paul H. Gobster.  Page 2.

 

ECONOMICS AND FOREST AMENITIES

 

An alternate property tax program requiring a forest management plan and scheduled harvesting.

D. F. Dennis and P. E. Sendak.  Page 15.

Effects of gypsy moth infestation on near-view aesthetic preferences and recreation behavior intentions.

S. J. Hollenhorst, S. M. Brock, W. A. Freimund, and M. J. Twery.  Page 23.

The scenic impact of key forest attributes and long-term management alternatives for hardwood forests.

R. G. Ribe.  Page 34.

              

   HARVESTING AND UTILIZATION

 

Shipping coal to Newcastle: are SRIC Populus plantations a viable fiber production option for the Central Hardwood Region?

C. H. Strauss.  Page 55.

Harvesting impacts on steep slopes in Virginia.

W. B. Stuart and J. L . Carr.  Page 67.

Impact of timber harvesting on residual trees in a Central Hardwood forest in Indiana.

T. W. Reisinger and P. E. Pope.  Page 82.

A comparison of small tractors for thinning central hardwoods.

N. Huyler and C. B. LeDoux.  Page 92.

Comparing partial cutting practices in central Appalachian hardwoods.

G. W. Miller and H. C. Smith.  Page 105.

Integrating forest growth and harvesting cost models to improve forest management planning.

J. E. Baumgras and C. B. LeDoux.  Page 120.

Computerized algorithms for partial cuts.

R. L. Ernst and S. L. Stout.  Page 132.

The interactive impact of forest site and stand attributes and logging technology on stand management.

C. B. LeDoux and J. E. Baumgras.  Page 148.

 

PHYSIOLOGY, GENETICS, AND ECOLOGY

 

Effects of drought and shade on growth and water use of Quercus alba, Q. bicolor, Q. imbricaria, and Q. palustris seedlings.

J. J. McCarthy and J. 0. Dawson.  Page 157.

Height and diameter variation in twelve white ash provenance/progeny tests in eastern United States.

G. Rink and F. H. Kung.  Page 179.

Stomatal conductance of seedlings of three oak species subjected to nitrogen fertilization and drought treatments.

W. D. Hechler, J. 0. Dawson, and E. H. DeLucia.  Page 188.

Stand density, stand structure, and species composition in transition oak stands of northwestern Pennsylvania.

S. L. Stout.  Page 194.

Composition and structure of an old-growth versus a second-growth white oak forest in southwestern Pennsylvania.

J. A. Downs and M. D. Abrams.  Page 207.

Changes in the relationship between annual tree growth and climatic variables for four hardwood species.

E. R. Smith and J. C. Rennie.  Page 224.

Community and edaphic analysis of mixed oak forests in the ridge and valley province of central Pennsylvania.

G. J. Nowacki and M. D. Abrams.  Page 247.

Extrapolation of forest community types with a geographic information system.

W. K. Clatterbuck and J. Gregory.  Page 261.

 

 

 

REGENERATION

 

Insects affecting establishment of northern red oak seedlings in central Pennsylvania.

J. Galford, L. R. Auchmoody, H. C. Smith, and R. S. Walters.  Page 271.

Using Roundup and Oust to control interfering understories in Allegheny hardwood stands.

S. B. Horsley.  Page 281.

Tree shelters increase heights of planted northern red oaks.

D. O. Lantagne.  Page 291.

Mammal caching of oak acorns in a red pine and a mixed oak stand.

E. R. Thorn and W. M. Tzilkowski.  Page 299.

Role of sprouts in regeneration of a whole-tree clearcut in central hardwoods of Connecticut.

C. W. Martin and L. M. Tritton.  Page 305.

Planting stock type x genotype interactions affect early outplanting performance of black walnut seedlings.

J. W. Van Sambeek, J. W. Hanover, and R. D. Williams.  Page 321.

Ten year regeneration of southern Appalachian hardwood clearcuts after controlling residual trees.

P. M. Zaldivar-Garcia and D. T. Tew.  Page 332.

Development of regeneration following gypsy moth defoliation of Appalachian Plateau and Ridge and Valley hardwood stands.

D. M. Hix, D. E. Fosbroke, R. R. Hicks, Jr., and K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 347.

 

SILVICULTURE, PROTECTION, AND MANAGEMENT

 

Silvicultural cutting opportunities in oak-hickory forests of West Virginia.

S. L. Arner, D. A. Gansner, M. E. Dale, and H. C. Smith.  Page 360.

Incidence of twolined chestnut borer and Hypoxylon atropunctatum on dead oaks along an acidic deposition gradient from Arkansas to Ohio.

R. A. Haack and R. W. Blank.  Page 373.

Black walnut tree growth in a mixed species, upland hardwood stand in southern Indiana.

R. K. Myers and B. C. Fischer.  Page 388.

Effectiveness of electric deer fences to protect planted seedlings in Pennsylvania.

D. W. George, T. W. Bowersox, and L. H. McCorrnick.  Page 395.

Releasing 75- to 80-year-old Appalachian hardwood sawtimber trees--5-year D.B.H. response.

H. C. Smith and G. W. Miller.  Page 402.

A stand density management diagram for sawtimber-sized mixed upland central hardwoods.

J. A. Kershaw, Jr. and B. C. Fischer.  Page 414.

Evaluation of an approach to improve acorn production during thinning.

W. E. Drake.  Page 429.

Independent effects and interactions of stand diameter, tree diameter, crown class, and age on tree growth in mixed-species, even-aged hardwood stands.

D. A. Marquis.  Page 442.

 

HYDROLOGY, SOILS, AND NUTRIENT CYCLING

 

Radial patterns of tree-ring chemical element concentration in two Appalachian hardwood stands.

D. R. DeWalle, B. R. Swistock, and W. E. Sharpe.  Page 459.

Factors affecting temporal and spatial soil moisture variation in and adjacent to group selection openings.

W. H. McNab.  Page 475.

Response of an Appalachian mountain forest soil, soil water, and associated herbaceous vegetation to liming.

W. E. Sharpe, B. R. Swistock, and D. R. DeWalle.  Page 489.

Long-term implications of forest harvesting on nutrient cycling in Central Hardwood forests.

J. A. Lynch and E. S. Corbett.  Page 500.

 

HARDWOOD MARKETS

 

Estimating timber supply from private forests.

D. F. Dennis.  Page 519.

New estimates of hardwood lumber exports from the Central Hardwood Region.

W. Luppold and R. E. Thomas.  Page 535.

Shiitake mushroom production on small diameter oak logs in Ohio.

S. M. Bratkovich.  Page 543.

The pallet industry: a changing hardwood market.

G. P. Dempsey and D. G. Martens.  Page 550.

Factors determining the location of forest products firms.

R. F. Fraser and F. M. Goode.  Page 556.

Are we underestimating the size of our hardwood industries?

S. M. Bratkovich and G. R. Passewitz.  Page 569.

 

POSTER SUMMARIES AND ABSTRACTS

 

Pistillate flower abortion in three species of oak.  (Abstract)

R. A. Cecich, G. L. Brown, and B. K. Piotter.  Page 578.

Measurement of forest condition and response along the Pennsylvania atmospheric deposition gradient.  (Summary)

D. D. Davis, J. M. Skelly, J. A. Lynch, L. H. McCormick, B. L. Nash, M. Simini, E. A. Cameron, J. R. McClenahen, and R. P. Long.  Page 579.

Impact of small mammals on regeneration of northern red oak.  (Abstract)

C. A. DeLong and R. H. Yahner.  Page 581.

Hardwood stumpage price trends in New England.  (Abstract)

D. F. Dennis and P. E. Sendak.  Page 582.

Predicting tree mortality following gypsy moth defoliation.  (Summary)

D. E. Fosbroke, R. R. Hicks, Jr., and K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 583.

Invasion of a partially cut oak stand by hayscented fern.  (Summary)

J. W. Groninger and L. H. McCormick.  Page 585.

Microcoppice: a new strategy for red oak clonal propagation. (Abstract)

D. E. Harper and B. H. McCown.  Page 586.

Field testing a soil site field guide from Allegheny hardwoods.  (Abstract)

S. B. Jones.  Page 587.

Comparison of northern goshawk nesting habitat in Appalachian oak and northern hardwood forests of Pennsylvania.  (Abstract)

J. T. Kimmel and R. H. Yahner.  Page 588.

Response of chestnut oak and red oak to drought and fertilization: growth and physiology. (Summary)

K. W. Kleiner, M. D. Abrams, and J. C. Schultz.  Page 589.

Physiological and structural foliar characteristics of four central Pennsylvania barrens species in contrasting light regimes.  (Abstract)

B. D. Kloeppel, M. E. Kubiske, and M. D. Abrams.  Page 590.

Effect of stand age and soils on forest composition of Spotsylvania Battlefield, Virginia. (Abstract)

D. A. Orwig and M. D. Adams.  Page 591.

Field response of red oak, pin cherry, and black cherry seedlings to a light gradient. (Summary)

M. R. Roberts.  Page 592.

Pioneer Mothers' Memorial Forest revisited.  (Summary)

R. C. Schlesinger, D. T. Funk, P. L. Roth, and C. C. Myers.  Page 594.

Survival and growth of direct-seeded and natural northern red oak after clearcutting a mature red pine plantation.  (Summary)

R. D. Shipman and D. B. Dimarcello.  Page 596.

TREEGRAD: a grading program for eastern hardwoods.  (Summary)

J. W. Stringer and D. W. Cremeans.  Page 598.

White oak seedling survival and vigor following acorn removal and water stress. (Abstract)

E. R. Thom and W. M. Tzilkowski.  Page 600.

Understory composition of hardwood stands in north-central West Virginia.  (Summary)

M. J. Twery.  Page 601.

Hardwoods are now being harvested at record levels.  (Abstract)

R. H. Widmann.  Page 603.

Planting northern red oak: a comparison of stock types.  (Summary)

J. J. Zaczek, K. C. Steiner, and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 604.


CONFERENCE IX--1993

 

SPONSORED BY:

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, WEST LAFAYETTE, IN, &

NORTH CENTRAL FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, ST. PAUL, MN

 

NCFES Technical Report NC-161

 

Foreword of the Ninth Proceedings

 

            This proceedings resulted from the ninth in a series of biennial conferences held at various Universities throughout the Central Hardwood Forest Region.  The conference was successful in providing a forum for discussion of the biology and management of hardwood forests by scientists from throughout the eastern United States.  Papers contained within this proceedings provide a continuing documentation of the broad array of research programs attempting to understand this diverse forest resource.  As with previous proceedings topics range from basic biology and ecologi­cal processes to economic value and management.

 

            The social and biological characteristics of the Central Hardwood Region make it unique in comparison with other forest regions of the United States.  One-fourth of the United State's human population reside in this region.  Approximately 90% of the land is in private ownership and public lands tend to be small and fragmented with private inholdings.  The papers presented in this proceedings are important to the long-term management of this unique region.

 

                                                                                                Andrew R. Gillespie

                                                                                                George R. Parker

                                                                                                Phillip E. Pope

                                                                                                Editors

 

Table of Contents of the Ninth Proceedings

 

OVERVIEW ARTICLES

 

Perspectives, trends, and forestry opportunities.

C. F. Bey.  Page 1.

Central Hardwood forests: recent trends in a robust resource.

T. W. Birch, D. A. Gansner, and W. H. McWillians.  Page 8.

Growth and shifts in eastern hardwood lumber production.

W. G. Luppold and G. P. Dempsey.  Page 17.

Oak silviculture, management, and defoliation effects in France and Germany.

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 23.

 

FOREST BIOLOGY

 

Comparative physiology of a Central Hardwood old-growth forest canopy and forest gap.

A. R. Gillespie, J. Waterman, and K. Saylors.  Page 46.

Bark thermal properties of selected Central Hardwood species.

G. E. Hengst and J. 0. Dawson.  Page 55.

Eco-physiology of Acer saccharum trees on glade-like sites in central Missouri.

E. J. Rhodenbaugh and S. G. Pallardy.  Page 76.

The endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae): biology, management considerations, and data gaps.

R. A. Haack.  Page 83.

A graphic technique for identifying superior seed sources for central hardwoods.

F. H. Kung and G. Rink.  Page 101.

Phenology and recruitment of Ohio buckeye and sugar maple in Illinois forest stands.

M. Henderson, J. 0. Dawson, and E. H. DeLucia.  Page 107.

 

FOREST PROTECTION

 

Impacts of pear thrips on a Pennsylvania sugarbush: third-year results.

T. E. Kolb and L. H. McCormick.  Page 119.

Forest stand conditions after 13 years of gypsy moth infestation.

D. L. Feicht, S. L.C. Fosbroke, and M. J. Twery.  Page 130.

Susceptibility of oak regeneration in clearcuts to defoliation by gypsy moth.

R. R. Hicks, Jr., R. M. Fultineer, B. S. Ware, and K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 145.

Predictability of gypsy moth defoliation in central hardwoods: a validation study.

D. E. Fosbroke and R. R. Hicks, Jr.  Page 156.

Mapping the defoliation potential of gypsy moth.

D. A. Gansner, S. L. Arner, R. R. Hershey, and S. L. King.  Page 172.

 

SILVICULTURE

 

Artificial regeneration of northern red oak in the Lake States with a light shelterwood: a departure from tradition.

R. M. Teclaw and J. G. Isebrands.  Page 185.

Survival and growth for the first-growing season of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings underplanted in mixed upland hardwood stands in south-central Iowa.

R. E. Bardon and D. W. Countryman.  Page 195.

Vegetative propagation of mature and juvenile northern red oak.

J. J. Zaczek, K. C. Steiner,  and C. W. Heuser, Jr.  Page 210.

Survival and growth of planted northern red oak in northern West Virginia.

C. A. McNeel, D. M. Hix, and E. C. Townsend.  Page 222.

Group selection-problems and possibilities and for the more shade-intolerant species.

P. A. Murphy, M. G. Shelton, and D. L. Graney.  Page 229.

Logging damage to residual trees following partial cutting in an green ash-sugarberry stand in the Mississippi delta.

J. S. Meadows.  Page 248.

Hardwood regeneration twenty years after three distinct diameter-limit cuts in upland central hardwoods.

R. B. Heiligmann and J. S. Ward.  Page 261.

Factors limiting northern red oak reproduction in Pennsylvania.

R. S. Walters and L. R. Auchmoody.  Page 271.

 

FOREST ECOLOGY

 

Vegetation of loess bluff ravines in the Jackson Purchase region of Kentucky.

W. S. Bryant.  Page 281.

The Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project: the effects of forest management on the forest ecosystem.

B. Brookshire and C. Hauser.  Page 289.

An ecological classification system for the Central Hardwoods Region: the Hoosier National Forest.

J. E. Van Kley and G. R. Parker.  Page 308.

 

STAND INVENTORY, YIELD, AND DYNAMICS

 

A comparison of forest dynamics at two sites in the southeastern Ozark Mountains of Missouri.

M. A. Jenkins and S. G. Pallardy. Page 327.

Influence of crown class, diameter, and sprout rank on red maple (Acer rubrum L.)  development during forest succession in Connecticut.

J. S. Ward and G. R Stephens.  Page 342.

Formulating a stand-growth model for mathematical programming problems in Appalachian forests.

G. W. Miller and J. Sullivan.  Page 353.

 

FOREST ECONOMICS AND MARKETING

 

Production rates and costs of group-selection harvests with ground-based logging system.

C. B. LeDoux, M. D. Erickson, and C. C. Hassler.  Page 363.

Profitability of precommercially thinning oak stump sprouts.

J. P. Dwyer, D. C. Dey, and W. B. Kurtz.  Page 373.

Relative price trends for hardwood stumpage, sawlogs, and lumber in Ohio.

J. E. Baumgras and W. G. Luppold.  Page 381.

Public land use and potential impact on Missouri's forest products industry.

B. E. Cutter and W. B. Kurtz.  Page 390.

 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AND SCIENCE

 

The effect of small rodents on northern red oak acorns in north-central West Virginia.

L. S. Gribko and D. M. Hix.  Page 400.

Developing regeneration in woodlots at Gettysburg National Military Park.

T. W. Bowersox, G. L. Storm, and W. M. Tzilkowski.  Page 409.

Deer exclusion effects on understory development following partial cutting in a Pennsylvania oak stand.

L. H. McCorrnick, J. W. Groninger, K. A. Penrod, and T. E. Ristau.  Page 418.

Lease hunting in the Central Hardwood Region: an examination of tradeoffs.

S. M. Bratkovich and D. W. Floyd.  Page 428.

 

FOREST SOILS AND TREE NUTRITION

 

The effects of pruning treatments and initial seedling morphology on northern red oak seedling growth.

D. J. Kaczmarek and P. E. Pope.  Page 436.

Performance of hardwoods planted with autumn olive after removing prior cover.

F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 447.

Interplanting woody nurse crops promotes differential growth of black walnut saplings.

J. 0. Dawson and J. W. Van Sambeek.  Page 455.

 

POSTER MANUSCRIPTS, SUMMARIES, AND ABSTRACTS

 

A review and validation of the IMPLAN model for Pennsylvania’s solid hardwood

product industries.

B. E. Lord and C. H. Strauss.  Page 465.

Advance reproduction and other stand characteristics in Pennsylvania and French stands of northern red oak.

K. C. Steiner, M. D. Abrams, and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 473.

The effects of gypsy moth defoliated on soil water chemistry.  (Abstract)

T. R. Eagle, Jr. and R. R. Hicks, Jr.  Page 484.

Selected soil enzyme activities in an oak-hickory forest following long term prescribed burning.  (Summary)

M. R. Bayan and F. Eivazi.  Page 485.

Management and prediction of red oak decline in the Missouri Ozarks.  (Abstract)

J. J. Wetteroff and J. P. Dwyer.  Page 488.

An assessment of advance regeneration and herbaceous communities in Pennsylvania forests.  (Abstract)

W. H. McWilliams, S. L. Stout, T. W. Bowersox, and L. H. McCormick.  Page 489.

Characterizing forest composition of the Allegheny Mountains using extensive forest inventory data.  (Abstract)

W. H. McWillaims, R. R. Hershey, D. A. Drake, and C. L. Alerich.  Page 490.

Development of an ecological classification system for the Wayne National Forest.

D. M. Hix and A. M. Chech.  Page 491.

Early development of mixed-species stands on the Wayne National Forest.

 E. R. Norland and D. M. Hix.  Page 502.

Interaction between competing vegetation, herbivores, and environmental conditions affecting regeneration of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.).  (Abstract)

D. S. Buckley, T. L. Sharik, J. G. Isebrands, and W. J. Mahalak.  Page 511.

Soil nitrogen mineralization and cellulose decomposition in northern red oak stands with four levels of canopy cover in northern Lower Michigan.  (Abstract)

C. Kim, T. L. Sharik, M. F. Jurgensen, R. E. Dickson, and W. J. Mahalak.  Page 512.

Effect of ectomycorrhizae on 1-year old northern red oak seedlings in response to overstory and understory manipulations in oak and pine stands.  (Abstract)

M. Zhou, T. L. Sharik, M. F. Jurgensen, D. L. Richter, and W. J. Mahalak.  Page 513.

Ground fire effects in a sapling-sized oak-maple stand.  (Summary)

J. W. Stringer.  Page 514.


CONFERENCE X--1995

 

SPONSORED BY:

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, MORGANTOWN &

NORTHEASTERN FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, RADNOR, PA

 

NEFES General Technical Report NE-197

 

Foreword of the Tenth Proceedings

 

            This conference is the tenth in a series of biennial meetings that began in 1976 at Southern Illinois University.  Other conferences have been hosted by Purdue University, University of Missouri, University of Kentucky, University of Illinois, University of Tennessee, Southern Illinois University with the North Central Forest Experiment Station (NCFES), Pennsylvania State University with the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, and Purdue University with NCFES.  The purpose of these conferences has remained the same: to provide a forum for the exchange of information concerning the biology and management of central hardwoods by forest scientists from throughout the Central Hardwood Region of the eastern United States.  As with previous Proceedings, a wide range of topics that represent the broad array of research programs in this area is represented.

 

            The social and biological characteristics of the Central Hardwood Forest Region make it unique in comparison with other forest regions of the United States.  For example, one-fourth of the United States human population resides in this region.  Approximately 90% of the land is in private ownership and public lands tend to be small and fragmented with private inholdings.  These and related conditions play critical roles in the practice of forestry in this region.  The information presented in this Proceedings is important to the long-term management of the forest resources of this unique region.

 

                                                                                                Kurt W. Gottschalk

                                                                                                Sandra L. C. Fosbroke

                                                                                                Editors

 

 

Table of Contents of the Tenth Proceedings

 

OVERVIEW ARTICLES

 

Walking the talk.  (Summary)

Robert C. Kellison.  Page 1.

Forest health assessment for eastern hardwood forests.

Daniel B. Twardus.  Page 3.

 

STAND DYNAMICS

 

Characteristics and dynamics of an upland Missouri old-growth forest.

R. H. Richards, S. R. Shifley, A. J. Rebertus, and S. J. Chaplin.  Page 11.

Structural and compositional differences between old-growth and mature growth forests in the Missouri Ozarks.

S. R. Shifley, L. M. Roovers, and B. L. Brookshire.  Page 23.

Development of a central hardwood stand following whole-tree clearcutting in Connecticut.

C. W. Martin.  Page 37.

Impacts of electric deer exclusion fencing and soils on plant species abundance, richness, and diversity following clearcutting in Pennsylvania.

J. Lyon and W. E. Sharpe.  Page 47.

Variability in oak forest herb layer communities.

J. R. McClenahen and R. P. Long.  Page 60.

     

NUTRIENT CYCLING I

 

Carbon and nitrogen pools in oak-hickory forests of varying productivity.

D. J. Kaczmarek, K. S. Rodkey, R. T. Reber, P. E. Pope, and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 79.

The distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in forest floor layers of oak-hickory forests ofvarying productivity.

K. S. Rodkey, D. J. Kaczmarek, and P. E. Pope.  Page 94.

Plant and soil nutrients in young versus mature central Appalachian hardwood stands.

F. S. Gilliam and M. B. Adams.  Page 109.

Nutrient budgets of two watersheds on the Fernow Experimental Forest.

M. B. Adams, J. N. Kochenderfer, T. R. Angradi, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 119.

The effects of doubling annual N and S deposition on foliage and soil chemistry and growth of Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis Sieb. and Zucc.) in north-central West Virginia.

C. J. Pickens, W. E. Sharpe, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 131.

 

SILVICULTURE I

 

Tree survivorship in an oak-hickory forest in southeast Missouri, USA, under a long-term regime of annual and periodic controlled burning.

J. A. Huddle and S. G. Pallardy.  Page 141.

Chemical release of pole-sized trees in a central hardwood clearcut.

J. W. Van Sambeek, D. A. Kai, and D. B. Shenaut.  Page 152.

Forest values and how to sustain them.  (Abstract)

L. S. Minckler.  Page 158.

Changes in a Missouri Ozark oak-hickory forest during 40 years of uneven-aged management.

E. F. Loewenstein, H. E. Garrett, P. S. Johnson, and J. P. Dwyer.  Page 159.

 

NUTRIENT CYCLING II

 

Forest floor C02 flux from two contrasting ecosystems in the southern Appalachians.  J. M. Vose, B. D. Clinton, and V. Emrick.  Page 165.

Acid-base status of upper rooting zone soil in declining and non-declining sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) stands in Pennsylvania.

W. E. Sharpe and T. L. Sunderland.  Page 172.

Tree-ring chemistry response in black cherry to ammonium sulfate fertilization at two West Virginia sites.

D. R. DeWalle, J. S. Tepp, C. J. Pickens, P. J. Edwards, and W. E. Sharpe.  Page 179.

Elemental concentrations in foliage of red maple, red oak, and white oak in relation to atmospheric deposition in Pennsylvania.

D. D. Davis, J. M. Skelly, and B. L. Nash.  Page 188.

 

ECOLOGY

 

Landscape-level regeneration adequacy for native hardwood forests of Pennsylvania.

W. H. McWilliams, T. W. Bowersox, D. A. Gansner, L. H. McCormick, and S. L. Stout. Page 196.

Landscape variation in species diversity and succession as related to topography, soils and human disturbance.  (Summary)

J. N. Pearcy, D. M. Hix, and S. A. Drury.  Page 204.

Canopy openings and white-tailed deer influence the understory vegetation in mixed oak woodlots.

T. W. Bowersox, G. L. Storm, and W. M. Tzilkowski.  Page 206.

History of Deer Population Trends and Forest Cutting on the Allegheny National Forest.

J. Redding.  Page 214.

Effects of two-age management and clearcutting on songbird density and reproductive success.  (Abstract)

J. V. Nichols and P. B. Wood.  Page 225.

 

GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY

 

An analysis of phenotypic selection in natural stands of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.).

J. W. Stringer, D. B. Wagner, S. E. Schlarbaum, and D. B. Houston.  Page 226.

Pollination biology of northern red and black oak.

R. A. Cecich and W. W. Haenchen.  Page 238.

Age trends in genetic control of Juglans  nigra L. height growth.

G. Rink and F. H. Kung.  Page 247.

Effects of hayscented fern density and light on white ash seedling growth.

T. E. Hippensteel and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 256.

The influence of shade on northern red oak seedlings growth and carbon balance. (Abstract) 

J. Jennings.  Page 271.

 

HYDROLOGY AND SOILS

 

Characteristics of a long-term forest soil productivity research site in Missouri.

F. Ponder, Jr. and N. M. Mikkelson.  Page 272.

A summary of water yield experiments on hardwood forested watersheds in northeastern             United States.

J. W. Hornbeck, M. B. Adams, E. S. Corbett, E. S. Verry, and J. A. Lynch.  Page 282.

Seasonal  isotope hydrology of Appalachian forest catchments.  (Abstract)

D. R. DeWalle, P. J. Edwards, B. R. Swistock, R. J. Drimmie, and R. Aravena.  Page 296.

Spatial characteristics of topography, energy exchange, and forest cover in a central Appalachian watershed.

S. J. Tajchman, H. Fu, J. N. Kochenderfer, and P. Chunshen.  Page 297.

Drought tolerance of sugar maple ecotypes.  (Abstract)

R. J. Hauer and J. 0. Dawson.  Page 315.

 

REGENERATION I

 

Tree regeneration following group selection harvesting in southern Indiana.

D. R. Weigel and G. R. Parker.  Page 316.

Regeneration in defoliated and thinned hardwood stands of north-central West Virginia.

R. M. Muzika and M. J. Twery.  Page 326.

Two-year results of herbicide released, naturally-regenerated bottomland cherrybark and shumard oak seedlings.

J. F. Thompson, Jr. and L. E. Nix.  Page 341.

Site preparation for red oak plantation establishment on old field sites in southern Indiana.

R. A. Rathfon, D. J. Kaczmarek, and P. E. Pope.  Page 349.

An eight-acre black walnut plantation: history and observations 1982-1994.  (Abstract)

C. J. Saboites.  Page 363.

 

SILVICULTURE II

 

Development and quality of reproduction in two-age central Appalachian hardwoods- 10-year results.

G. W. Miller and T. M. Schuler.  Page 364.

Shelterwood treatments fail to establish oak reproduction on mesic forest sites in West Virginia--10-year results.

T. M. Schuler and G. W. Miller.  Page 375.

Intensity of precommercial crop-tree release increases diameter and crown growth in upland hardwoods.

J .S. Ward.  Page 388.

Individual tree-versus stand-level approaches to thinning: is it a choice of one or the other, or a combination of both?  (Abstract)

C.A. Nowak.  Page 399.

 

FOREST HEALTH

 

Forest health in West Virginia: past, present and future.  (Abstract)

R. R. Hicks, Jr., and D. A. Mudrick.  Page 400.

Spatial trends in relative stocking  point to potential problems in forest health.

D. A. Gansner, S. L. King, S. L. Arner, R. H. Widmann, and D. A. Drake.  Page 401.

Dimilin effects on leaf-decomposing aquatic fungi on the Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia.

T. Dubey, S. L. Stephenson, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 421.

The effect of acorn insects on the establishment and vigor of northern red oak seedlings in north-central West Virginia.

L. S. Gribko.  Page 430.

 

HARVESTING AND ECONOMICS

 

Logging safety in forest management education.

D. E. Fosbroke and J. R. Myers.  Page 442.

Forest management practices and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Logging Standard.

J. R. Myers and D. E. Fosbroke.  Page 454.

Hardwood silviculture and skyline yarding on steep slopes: economic and environmental impacts.

J. E. Baumgras and C .B. LeDoux.  Page 463.

FOREX--An expert system for managing even-aged upland oak forests on steep terrain.

C. B. LeDoux, B. Gopalakrishnan, and K. Lankalapalli.  Page 474.

Effect of the hardwood resource on the sawmill industry in the Central and Appalachian Regions.

W. Luppold.  Page 481.

Variation in pin knot frequency in black walnut lumber cut from a small provenance/progeny test.  (Abstract)

P. Y. S. Chen, R. E. Bodkin, and J. W. Van Sambeek.  Page 488.

 

REGENERATION II

 

Autumn predation of northern red oak seed crops.

K. C. Steiner.  Page 489.

Planting depth effects and water potential effects on oak seedling emergence and acorn germination.  (Abstract)

W. A. Smiles and J. O. Dawson.  Page 495.

Use of plastic films for weed control during field establishment of micropropagated hardwoods.

J. W. Van Sambeek, J. E. Preece, C. A. Huetteman, and P. L. Roth.  Page 496.

Protection of tree seedlings from deer browsing.

J. S. Ward and G. R. Stephens.  Page 507.

Effects of tree shelters on planted red oaks after six growing seasons.

D. O. Lantagne.  Page 515.

 

POSTER MANUSCRIPTS, SUMMARIES AND ABSTRACTS

 

Red spruce/hardwood ecotones in the central Appalachians.  (Abstract)

H. S. Adams, S. L. Stephenson, D. M. Lawrence, M. B. Adams, and J. D. Eisenback.  Page 522.

Nitrogen dynamics in oak forest soils along a historical deposition gradient.

R. E. J. Boerner and E. K. Sutherland.  Page 523.

Temporal variation in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in mesic southern Appalachian hardwood forests with and without Rhododendron understories.

B. D. Clinton.  Page 534.

Short term evaluation of harvesting systems for ecosystem management.  (Abstract)

M. D. Erickson, P. Peters, and C. Hassler.  Page 541.

Herbaceous vegetation in thinned and defoliated forest stands in north-central West Virginia. (Abstract)

S. L. C. Fosbroke, D. Feicht, and R. M. Muzika.  Page 542.

Defoliation and mortality patterns in forests silviculturally managed for gypsy moth. (Abstract)

K. W. Gottschalk and R. M. Muzika.  Page 543.

A generalized ingrowth model for the northeastern United States.  (Abstract)

L. S. Gribko, D. E. Hilt, and M. A. Fajvan.  Page 544.

Black walnut response to subsoiling, irrigation, and vegetation management on a site with a shallow fragipan.  (Abstract)

F. D. McBride and J. W. Van Sambeek.  Page 545.

Distribution, dispersal and abundance of hayscented fern spores in mixed hardwood stands. (Abstract)

L. H. McCormick and K. A. Penrod.  Page 546.

Identification of canopy strata in Allegheny hardwood stands.  (Abstract)

D. W. McGill, S. B. Jones, and C.A. Nowak.  Page 547.

A method for applying group selection in central Appalachian hardwoods.  (Abstract)

G. W. Miller and T. M. Schuler.  Page 548.

Fifty-year response of a 135-yr-old white pine stand to partial thinning in Connecticut. (Abstract)

D. S. Nicholson and J. S. Ward.  Page 549.

Forest stand development on 6 26-year-old clearcuts in southeastern Ohio.  (Abstract)

E. R. Norland and D. M. Hix.  Page 550.

Vegetation analysis, environmental relationships, and potential successional trends in the Missouri Forest Ecosystem Project.

S. G. Pallardy.  Page 551.

Timber marking guidelines to minimize chainsaw felling accidents.  (Summary)

P. A. Peters, M. D. Erickson, and C. D. Hassler.  Page 563.

Mating parameter estimates of black walnut based on natural and artificial populations. (Abstract)

G. Rink, G. Zhang, Z. Jinghua, and F. H. Kung.  Page 564.

Variation among northern red oak provenances in bark thickness: DBH ratios.

M .S. Russell and J. 0. Dawson.  Page 565.

Preliminary guidelines for the use of tree shelters to regenerate northern red oak and other hardwood species on good to excellent growing sites.  (Abstract)

T. M. Schuler, G. W. Miller, and H. C. Smith.  Page 573.

The effect of site disturbance on nitrogen and phosphorus availability in Indiana oak-hickory forests.  (Abstract)

D. A. Scott, P. E. Pope, D. J. Kaczmarek, and K. S. Rodkey.  Page 574.

Salamander abundance in small clearcuts.  (Abstract)

D. A. Soehn and E. D. Michael.  Page 575.

Production and trade flows of Michigan forest products.  (Abstract)

J. Stevens.  Page 576.

Ecosystems management research in hardwood forests dominated by deer.  (Abstract)

S. L. Stout, D. S. deCalesta, S. B. Horsley, C. A. Nowak, and J. C. Redding.  Page 577.


CONFERENCE XI--1997

 

SPONSORED BY

THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, COLUMBIA,

NORTH CENTRAL FOREST EXPERIMENT STATION, ST PAUL, MN, &

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

 

NCFES General Technical Report NC-188

 

Foreword of the Eleventh Proceedings

 

            This conference is the eleventh in a series of biennial meetings that began  in 1976 at Southern Illinois University.  Other conferences have been hosted by Purdue University, University of Kentucky, University of Illinois, University of Tennessee, Southern Illinois University with the North Central Forest Experiment Station (NCFES), Pennsylvania State University with the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (NEFES), Purdue University with NCFES and West Virginia University with the NEFES.  The purpose of these conferences has been the same: to provide a forum for the exchange of information concerning the biology and management of Central Hardwood forests by forest scientists throughout the region.  As with previous proceedings, a wide range of topics that represent the broad array of research programs in this region are presented.  The information in this Proceedings is important to the long-term management of forest resources in this unique region.

           

                                                                                                Stephen G. Pallardy

                                                                                                Robert A. Cecich

                                                                                                H. Gene Garrett

                                                                                                Paul S. Johnson

                                                                                                Editors

 

Table of Contents of the Eleventh Proceedings

 

OVERVIEW ARTICLES

 

A resource at the crossroads: a history of the central hardwoods.

R. R. Hicks, Jr.  Page 1.

Sustaining biodiversity in midwestern woodlands.  (Abstract)

D. Ladd.  Page 23.

Industry's needs and concerns.  (Abstract)

W. Luppold.  Page 24.

Integrating silviculture, forest management, and forest policy.  (Abstract)

C. Oliver.  Page 25.

 

HARVESTING

 

Evaluating timber harvesting impacts on wildlife habitat suitability using FOREX.

C. B. LeDoux.  Page 26.

Residual tree damage during selection cuts using two skidding systems in the Missouri Ozarks.

R. L.  Ficklin, J. P. Dwyer, B. E. Cutter, and T. Draper.  Page 36.

Perceived impacts of disturbance in Central Hardwood ecosystems.  (Abstract)

J. Hetherington and J. Burde.  Page 47.

 

FOREST HEALTH

 

Nitrogen budgets on Appalachian forest catchments.  (Abstract)

D. R. DeWalle.  Page 48.

Spatial patterns of Armillaria populations in the Walker Branch Watershed throughfall displacement experiment, Tennessee, USA.

J. N. Bruhn, J. A. Brenneman, J. J. Wetteroff, Jr., J. D. Mihail, and T. D. Leininger.  Page 49.

The gypsy moth in the central hardwoods: research and management needs. (Abstract)

R. Lawrence, S. Burks, D. Haugen, and M. Linit.  Page 58.

Summary of mortality statistics and forest health monitoring results for the northeastern United States.

W. H. McWilliams, S. L. Arner, and C. J. Barnett.  Page 59.

 

ECONOMICS

 

Trends in hardwood timber resources for the northern states

R. H. Widmann and T. L. Schmidt.  Page 76.

Private forest owners of the Central Hardwood Forest.

T. W Birch.  Page 89.

Identifying forest lands in urban areas in the Central Hardwood Region.

T. W. Birch, R. R. Hershey, and P. Kern.  Page 98.

Distribution and extent of tree mortality in north-central hardwood forests.

J. M. Vasievich, S. L. Hobrla, and M. H. Hansen.  Page 117.

Hardwood timber sales on state forests in Indiana: characteristics influencing costs and prices.

J. M. Vasievich, W. L. Mills, Jr., and H. R. Cherry.  Page 118.

The efficacy of economic-development programs in forest-dependent communities. (Abstract)

R. F. Fraser.  Page 129.

 

SILVICULTURE AND STAND DYNAMICS I

 

An evaluation of uneven-aged cutting methods in even-aged oak-hickory stands in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas.

D. L. Graney and P. A. Murphy.  Page 130.

Diameter growth of trees in an uneven-aged oak forest in the Missouri Ozarks. (Summary)

E. F. Loewenstein, P. S Johnson, and H. E. Garrett.  Page 147.

Stability of diameter distributions in a managed uneven-aged oak forest in the Ozark Highlands.  (Abstract)

Z. Wang, P. S. Johnson, H. E. Garrett, and S. R. Shifley.  Page 149.

Forest ingrowth prediction model for the northeastern United States.  (Abstract)

L. S. Gribko.  Page 150.

Planting oaks in the Central Hardwood Region: a shelterwood approach.  (Abstract)

D. R. Weigel and P. S. Johnson.  Page 151.

 

ECOLOGY

 

Ground cover in old-growth forests of the Central Hardwood Region.

M. A. Spetich, S. R. Shifley, G. R. Parker, and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 152.

Disturbance-related changes in ground flora of West Virginia oak forests.  (Abstract)

R. M. Muzika, D. L. Feicht, and S. L. Fosbroke.  Page 161.

Changes in down dead wood volume across a chronosequence of silvicultural openings in southern Indiana forests.

M. A. Jenkins and G. R. Parker.  Page 162.

Changes in fine root dynamics and distribution along a chronosequence of upland oak hickory forests.  (Summary)

T. W. Idol, P. E. Pope, and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 170.

 

ECOLOGY II

 

History of fire in a southern Ohio second-growth mixed-oak forest.

E. K. Sutherland.  Page 172.

Vegetation-site relationships and fire history of a savanna-glade-woodland mosaic in the Ozarks.

S. E. Jenkins, R. Guyette, and A. J. Rebertus.  Page 184.

Validation of BEHAVE fire behavior predictions in oak savannas using five fuel models.

K. Grabner, J. Dwyer, and B. Cutter.  Page 202.

Spatial configuration and distribution of forest patches in Champaign County, Illinois: 1940 to 1993.  (Abstract)

J. D. Chinea.  Page 216.

 

SILVICULTURE AND STAND DYNAMICS II

 

The midwest flood of 1993: did trees protect levees along the Missouri River?  (Abstract)

J. P. Dwyer, D. Wallace, and D. R.  Larsen.  Page 217.

Three-year bole response of white oak (Quercus alba L.) crop trees to fertilizer and crown release on a Tennessee upland site.  (Summary)

G. R. Schaertl, A. E. Houston, E. R. Buckner, and J. S. Meadows.  Page 218.

White ash (Fraxinus americana L.) survival and growth in unmanaged upland forests.

J. S. Ward.  Page 220.

Modeling forest landscape change in the Ozarks: guiding principles and preliminary implementation.

S. R. Shifley, F. R. Thompson, III, D. R. Larsen, and D. J. Mladenoff.  Page 231.

 

GENETICS AND PHYSIOLOGY

 

Micropropagation of juvenile and mature American elms from stem nodal sections.

A. M. Chanon, J. C. Kamalay, and P. Jourdan.  Page 242.

Establishment of northern red oak genetic tests with nursery-graded seedlings.  (Abstract)

S. A. Lay, M. A. Remaley, S. E. Schlarbaum, P. P. Kormanik, T. Tibbs, R. A. Cox, T. LaFarge, and A. M. Saxton.  Page 251.

Influence of weather on pollination and acorn production in two species of Missouri oaks.

R. A. Cecich.  Page 252.

Model of white oak flower survival and maturation.

D. R. Larsen and R. A. Cecich.  Page 262.

 

ECOLOGY III

 

Correlations among stand ages and forest strata in mixed-oak forests of southeastern Ohio.

P. C. Goebel and D. M. Hix.  Page 269.

Indicators of nitrate export from forested watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay region. (Abstract)

K. W. J. Williard.  Page 283.

The effect of partial cutting practices on forest stand structure in Appalachian hardwood forests.  (Abstract)

M. A. Fajvan and  S. T. Grushecky.  Page 284.

 

REGENERATION I

 

Effects of seasonal prescribed fires on hardwood advance regeneration in shelterwood stands.  (Abstract)

P. Brose and D. Van Lear.  Page 285.

Grass or fern competition reduce growth and survival of planted tree seedlings.

L. H. McCormick and T. W Bowersox.  Page 286.

Interference with shoot growth and flowering of dittany (Cunila origanoides (L.) Britton) by hardwood leachates.

J. W. Van Sambeek, J. M. Kobe, and J. S. Fralish.  Page 294.

Response of potted northern red oak and hay-scented fern to additions of calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus.

D. H. Hart and W. E. Sharpe.  Page 304.

 

REGENERATION II

 

Large-scale comparison of reforestation techniques commonly used in the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley: first year results.

C. J. Schweitzer, J. A. Stanturf, J. P. Shepard, T. M. Wilkins, C. J. Portwood, and L. C. Dorris, Jr.  Page 313.

Regeneration responses of oak-dominated stands to thinning and clearcutting in northwestern Pennsylvania.

J. A. Stanturf, L. R. Auchmoody, and R. S. Walters.  Page 321.

Survival and growth of hardwood seedlings following preplanting-root treatments and treeshelters.

F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 332.

Impact of soil scarification on the composition of regeneration and species diversity in an oak shelterwood.

J. J. Zaczek, J. Harding, and J. Welfley.  Page 341.

Two-year survival and growth of artificial northern red oak regeneration at Gettysburg National Military Park.  (Abstract)

D. S. Larrick, T. W. Bowersox, G. L. Storm, and W. M. Tzilkowski.  Page 349.

 

POSTER MANUSCRIPTS AND ABSTRACTS

     

Effect of tree shelters on above-ground stem biomass, leaf numbers and size, and height growth.  (Abstract)

D. O. Lantagne and G. Kowalewski.  Page 350.

Tree shelters fail to enhance height growth of northern red oak in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  (Abstract)

D. O. Lantagne and R. Miller.  Page 351.

Temporal variation in woody species composition from 1922 to 1996 in a second-growth Appalachian forest.  (Abstract)

T. M. Schuler.  Page 352.

Ecological classification systems for the Wayne National Forest, southeastern Ohio.  (Abstract)

D. M. Hix and J. N. Pearcy.  Page 353.

Fire history, population, and calcium cycling in the Current River watershed.

R. P. Guyette and B. E. Cutter.  Page 354.

Drought effects on leaf abscission and leaf production in Populus clones.

S. G. Pallardy and J. L. Rhoads.  Page 373.

Red maple development in mixed hardwood stands in West Virginia.  (Abstract)

 B. D. Tift.  Page 384.

Compensatory mechanisms of Central Hardwood Forest communities in a changing environment.  (Abstract)

S. Jose and A. R. Gillespie.  Page 385.

Patterns of northern red oak growth and mortality in western Pennsylvania.

J. R. McClenahen, R. J. Hutnik, and D. D. Davis.  Page 386.

Assessing species variation within forest cover types delineated using color-infrared aerial photographs.  (Abstract)

C. P. Neese, Jr., and L. S. Gribko.  Page 400.

Hay-scented fern spore production following clearcutting.  (Abstract)

K. A. Penrod and L. H. McCormick.  Page 401.


CONFERENCE XII--1999

 

SPONSORED BY

THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, &

SOUTHERN RESEARCH STATION, USDA, ASHVILLE, NC

 

SRS General Technical Report SRS-188

 

Foreword of the Twelfth Proceedings

 

            The Central Hardwood Forest stretches from the upper Southeast to the Great Lakes and from Arkansas to Massachusetts.  It is an oak-dominated deciduous forest occurring in hilly to mountainous areas of this vast region.  As such, it is the most extensive temperate deciduous forest in the world.  The tree species present are well adapted to the seasonal climate changes and the moderate rainfall found in the region.  The Central Hardwood Forest developed since the last ice age as forests reinvaded the region.  Land-use practices impacting the region include those imposed by Native Americans as well as significant impacts from European settlers.  These impacts include burning, grazing, land clearing, logging, fire control, wildlife management, and pest introductions.  These practices and impacts have influenced, to a large degree, the composition and the area covered by these forests.

 

            One-fourth of the population of the United States lives in this region and approximately 90 percent of the Central Hardwood Forest is owned by private interests comprised primarily of nonindustrial forest owners.  The Central Hardwood Forest is biologically and spatially complex.  The body of knowledge developed by scientists and practitioners on the biology and management of this forest is critical to the continued health and sustainability of this forest, The Conference provides a significant opportunity for scientists and practitioners to exchange information that will ultimately play an important part in the development of the Central Hardwood Forest.

 

            This Conference is the 12th in a series of biennial meetings that have been hosted by numerous universities and USDA Forest Service Experiment Stations in the Central Hardwood Forest Region.

 

            The purpose of this Conference has remained the same since its inception "To provide a forum for the exchange of information concerning the biology and management of central hardwoods by forest scientists from throughout the Central Hardwood Region of the Eastern United States." As with previous conferences in this series, a wide range of subjects have been presented representing the range of research efforts underway in the region.

 

            Since its beginning, the Central Hardwood Forest Conference has been an outlet for results of research focused on the forest itself or species that occur in the Central Hardwood Region.  There were 32 oral presentations, 11 abstracts, and 22 poster presentations accepted for the 12th Conference. Poster and oral presentation abstracts were accepted for publication along with full-length manuscripts.  Manuscripts have undergone a peer review process by two to three anonymous reviewers.  Reviewed manuscripts were returned to authors and revised electronic manuscripts were submitted for publication to the USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station.  In total, 7 percent of the manuscripts were rejected, 36 percent required major revision, 45 percent required minor revision, and 12 percent were accepted without revision.  Papers were edited to a uniform format and type style; however, authors are responsible for the accuracy and content of their papers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents of the Twelfth Proceedings

 

COMBINED SESSION

 

Changes in national forest timber sales in the Central Hardwood Region.

W. G. Luppold and J. E. Baumgras.  Page 3.

Oak planting success varies among ecoregions in the Central Hardwood Region.

 D. P. Weigel.  Page 9.

Effects of frost on hardwood regeneration in northern Wisconsin.

J. C. Zasada, R. M. Teclaw, D. S. Buckley, and J. G. Isebrands.  Page 17.

Red maple dynamics in Appalachian hardwood stands in West Virginia.  (Summary)

B. D. Tift and M. A. Fajvan.  Page 25.

 

NUTRIENT DYNAMICS

 

Effects of harvesting on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in a N-saturated hardwood forest.

F. S. Gilliam and M. B. Adams.  Page 29.

N dynamics across a chronosequence of upland oak-hickory forests.  (Summary)

T. W. Idol, P. E. Pope, and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 37.

Soil nutrient and microbial response to prescribed fire in an oak-pine ecosystem in eastern Kentucky.

B. A. Blankenship and M. A. Arthur.  Page 39.

 

STAND STRUCTURE

 

Comparison of ecological characteristics of three remnant old-growth woodlots in Belmont County, Ohio.

R. R. Hicks, Jr. and J. Holt.  Page 51.

Characterization of coarse woody debris across a 100 year chronosequence of upland oak-hickory forests.

T. W. Idol, P. E. Pope, R. A. Figler, and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 60.

 

REFORESTATION/RECLAMATION

 

Renewing a forest ecosystem irrigated with treated wastewater.

L. M. Ahlswede, T. W. Bowersox, and D. R. Jacobs.  Page 71.

Native high value tree reclamation on surface mined spoils in eastern Kentucky.

W. R. Thomas, M. H. Pelkki, and J. M. Ringe.  Page 79.

Growth of white and red oak seedlings and seed on mined ungraded cast overburden.

W. C. Ashby.  Page 84.

Long-term effects of wastewater irrigation on forested ecosystems at Pennsylvania State Game Lands 176.

D. S. Larrick and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 90.

Survivorship and growth of natural northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings in response to selected treatments on an extremely acidic forest soil.

M. C. Demchik and W. E. Sharpe.  Page 98.

Japanese and giant knotweed seed reproductive ecology.

A. T. Niewinski, T. W. Bowersox, and L. H. McCormick.  Page 103.

 

HARVESTING

 

Soil disturbance and productivity from wide-tired skidder trials in Minnesota aspen harvests.

M. F. Smidt and C. R. Blinn.  Page 115.

Impacts of harvest intensity and soil disturbance on early tree growth and earthworm populations in a Missouri Ozark forest.

F. Ponder, Jr., D. E. Alley, D. Jordan, M. E. Swartz, and V. C. Hubbard.  Page 121.

Contrasting timber harvesting operations illustrate the value of BMPs.

J. N. Kochenderfer and J. W. Hornbeck.  Page 128.

Harvesting strategies for increasing the availability and quality of hardwood fiber.

C. B. LeDoux.  Page 137.

     

MODELING/INVENTORY

 

Using dynamic programming to explore hardwood silvicultural regimes.

M. H. Pelkki.  Page 143.

Use of GPS and GIS in hardwood forest inventory.  (Abstract)

C. J. Liu.  Page 150.

Use Java and the internet to manage data and predict the future of forest stands.  (Abstract)

J. J. Colbert and G. Racin.  Page 151.

Estimating previous diameter for ingrowth trees on remeasured horizontal point samples.

S. L. King and S. L. Arner.  Page 152.

Neutral networks vs. multiple linear regression for estimating previous diameter.

S. L. King.  Page 159.

    

WILDLIFE

 

Autumn roosting habitat of male Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) in a managed forest setting in Kentucky.  (Summary)

J. R. MacGregor, J. D. Kiser, M. W. Gumbert, and T. O. Reed.  Page 169.

Foraging behavior and habitat use of red bats in mixed mesophytic forests of the Cumberland Plateau, Kentucky.

J. T. Hutchinson and M. J. Lacki.  Page 171.

White-tailed deer impact on forest regeneration: modeling landscape-level deer activity patterns.

L. S. Gribko, M. E. Hohn, and W. M. Ford.  Page 178.

 

SILVICULTURE

 

Development of oak regeneration nine years after shelterwood cutting and clearcutting on the Coastal Plain of west Tennessee.

W. K. Clatterbuck, P. Blakley, and P. Yielding.  Page 189.

Releasing sheltered northern red oak during the early stem exclusion stage.

T. M. Schuler and G. W. Miller.  Page 195.

Underplanted northern red oak 17 years after thinning and understory control and 8 years following overstory removal.  (Summary)

R. Rathfon and W. Werne.  Page 202.

Influence of cutting methods on 12-year-old hardwood regeneration in Connecticut.

J. S. Ward and G. R. Stephens.  Page 204.

Methods to improve establishment and growth of bottomland hardwood artificial regeneration.

C. J. Schweitzer, E. S. Gardiner, J. A. Stanturf, and A. W. Ezell.  Page 209.

Thinning effects on basal area growth of red maple (Acer rubrum L.).

H. A. Londo, T. R. Strong, H. Soares, and D. D. Reed.  Page 215.

Residual stand quality following implementation of uneven-aged silviculture in even-aged oak-hickory forests in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas.

M. A. Spetich, D. L. Graney, and P. A. Murphy.  Page 221.

Predicting sapling growth and recruitment in different size canopy gaps.

J. M. Goodburn and C. G. Lorimer.  Page 228.

 

DISTURBANCE EFFECTS

 

Individual tree five-year basal area and crown diameter growth in Appalachian hardwood stands as influenced by thinning and gypsy moth defoliation.  (Summary)

K. W. Gottschalk.  Page 233.

Individual tree mortality prediction functions from gypsy moth defoliation as well as tree, stand, and site variables.  (Abstract)

J. J. Colbert.  Page 234.

Characteristics of the chestnut blight fungus isolated from scarlet oak in Pennsylvania.

D. D. Davis and M. L. Torsello.  Page 235.

The effects of soil manganese on Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis Sieb. and Zucc.) seedlings in the greenhouse.

C. J. Schweitzer, W. E. Sharpe, and P. J. Edwards.  Page 240.

Northern red oak growth response to climate and industrial air pollution in western Pennsylvania.

J. R. McClenahen, D. D. Davis, and R. J. Hutnik.  Page 245.

 

GENETICS/TREE IMPROVEMENT

 

Survival and growth of a Quercus rubra regeneration cohort during five years following masting.

K. C. Steiner and B. J. Joyce.  Page 255.

Characteristics of northern red oak seedlings grown by family in a Tennessee nursery.  (Abstract)

S. A. Lay and S. E. Schlarbaum.  Page 258.

Field performance of in vitro propagated white ash microplants.  (Summary)

J. W. Van Sambeek, J. E. Preece, and J. J. Zaczek.   Page 259.

 

POSTER SUMMARIES AND ABSTRACTS

 

Soil sampling on surface mined spoils: systematic vs. systematic-composite vs. random.  (Summary)

W. R. Thomas, M. Pelkki, and J. Ringe.  Page 263.

Quaking aspen emergence and initial survival under different relative humidity, moisture, and seed placement treatments.  (Abstract)

L. A. Ahlswede and T. W. Bowersox.  Page 265.

Strategies for improving establishment and productivity of hardwoods planted on marginal agricultural lands in southern Illinois.  (Summary)

J. W. Groninger and J. J. Zaczek.  Page 266.

Modeling landscape change in the Missouri Ozarks in response to alternative management practices.  (Summary)

S. R. Shifley, F. R. Thompson III, W. D. Dijak, and D. R. Larsen.  Page 267.

A forest land allocation model for urbanizing landscapes. (Abstract)

A. D. Carver.  Page 269.

Managing forests for gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) using silviculture: testing the effectiveness of silvicultural treatments in reducing defoliation and mortality.  (Summary)

K. W. Gottschalk, R. M. Muzika, and M. J. Twery.  Page 270.

A stand density management diagram for Norway spruce plantations in central New York.  (Summary)

L. Zhang, F. Li, R. D. Nyland, and J. P. Halligan.  Page 271.

Forcing environment affects epicormic sprout production from branch segments for vegetative propagation of adult hardwoods.  (Summary)

J. W. Van Sambeek and J. E. Preece.  Page 272.

Long-term changes in tree composition in a mesic old-growth upland forest in southern Illinois.  (Summary)

J. J. Zaczek, J. W. Groninger, and J. W. Van Sambeek.  Page 274.

Assessment of residual stand damage and tree decay in partial harvests.  (Abstract)

M. D. Seese and M. A. Fajvan.  Page 276.

The effects of thinning intensity on snag and cavity tree abundance in an Appalachian hardwood stand.  (Summary)

A. Graves and M. A. Fajvan.  Page 277.

A comparison of FVS/Suppose computed volume with USDA Forest Service cruise volume on the Monongahela National Forest.  (Summary)

M. Thomas-Van Gundy.  Page 279.

The effect of using control bags on litterbag measurements of leaf litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics.  (Abstract)

K. A. Holzbaur, P. E. Pope, T. W. Idol and F. Ponder, Jr.  Page 281.

Understory fire effects on pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica L. f.) seed germination.  (Summary)

D. W. McGill, E. T. Bridge, and J. B. Hudson.  Page 282.

Using prescribed burning to release oak seedlings from shrub competition in southern Connecticut.  (Summary)

J. S. Ward and E. Gluck.  Page 283.

Construction methods for a county-wide land use/cover map.  (Summary)

C. J. Liu.  Page 284.

Comparison of NE-TWIGS and ZELIG on actual growth on two sites in Kentucky.  (Summary)

D. A. Yaussy.  Page 285

The impact of prescribed fire on herbivory levels of understory white oak.  (Summary)

A. S. Adams and L. K. Rieske-Kinney.  Page 286.

Nursery treatments alter root morphology of 1+0 northern red oak seedlings.  (Abstract)

P. T. Tomlinson.  Page 288.

Effects of leaf litter depth on acorn germination.  (Summary)

J. W. Stringer and L. Taylor.  Page 289.

Development of advanced oak regeneration from two-age reserve trees.

J. W. Stringer.  Page 291.

Impacts of gypsy moth suppression tactics on ground-dwelling arthropods.

L. J. Buss and L. K. Rieske-Kinney.  Page 294; inserted page.