Publication Details

The effects of prescribed fire and silvicultural thinning on the aboveground carbon stocks and net primary production of overstory trees in an oak-hickory ecosystem in southern Ohio

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Chiang, Jyh-Min; McEwan, Ryan W.; Yaussy, Daniel A.; Brown, Kim J.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Forest Ecology and Management. 255: 1584-1594.

Abstract

More than 70 years of fire suppression has influenced forest dynamics and led to the accumulation of fuels in many forests of the United States. To address these changes, forest managers increasingly seek to restore historical ecosystem structure and function through the reintroduction of fire and disturbance processes that mimic fire such as silvicultural thinning. In oak forests of eastern North America, prescribed fire and thinning are important tools used to facilitate oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration and recruitment. The global scientific community is increasingly raising concerns about the accumulation of atmospheric CO2, and its potential to impact global climate; therefore, activities such as prescribed fire and thinning that can influence the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems should be evaluated. We used field measurements and modeling with the PnET-II carbon balance model in oak forests of southern Ohio, USA, to (1) assess the efficacy of prescribed fire and silvicultural thinning in facilitating oak recruitment and regeneration, and (2) quantify the impacts of these treatments on aboveground carbon stocks and net primary production.

Keywords

Acer; ANPP; carbon stocks; fire and fire surrogate; oak regeneration; phenology; prescribed burning; Quercus; thinning

Citation

Chiang, Jyh-Min; McEwan, Ryan W.; Yaussy, Daniel A.; Brown, Kim J. 2008. The effects of prescribed fire and silvicultural thinning on the aboveground carbon stocks and net primary production of overstory trees in an oak-hickory ecosystem in southern Ohio. Forest Ecology and Management. 255: 1584-1594.

Last updated on: October 22, 2009