Publication Details

Evolution of invading forest pathogens via interspecific hybridization

Publication Toolbox

  • Download PDF (84313)
  • This publication is available only online.
Brasier, Clive

Year Published

2003

Publication

In: Fosbroke, Sandra L.C.; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. Proceedings, U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2002; 2002 January 15-18; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-300. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station: 3-4.

Abstract

Traditional morphologically-based fungal species concepts have tended to go hand in-hand with a perception that fungal species are genetically 'firewalled' units between which almost no gene flow occurs. Also, prior to 1990, known examples of interspecific hybridization in fungi were very rare. However, observations on the internationally invading Dutch elm disease pathogens suggested that intense ecological disturbance events, including introductions or invasions, could result in hybridization. Since this could also lead to changes in a pathogen's aggressiveness, host range or other fitness attributes, it has considerable implications for the health of forests and natural ecosystems.

Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Citation

Brasier, Clive. 2003. Evolution of invading forest pathogens via interspecific hybridization. In: Fosbroke, Sandra L.C.; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. Proceedings, U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 2002; 2002 January 15-18; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-300. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station: 3-4.

Last updated on: November 6, 2009