Publication Details

An insect out of control? The potential for spread and establishment of the gypsy moth in new forest areas in the United States

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McFadden, Max W.; McManus, Michael E.

Year Published

1991

Publication

In: Baranchikov, Yuri N.; Mattson, William J.; Hain, Fred P.; Payne, Thomas L., eds. Forest Insect Guilds: Patterns of Interaction with Host Trees; 1989 August 13-17; Abakan, Siberia, U.S.S.R. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-153. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 172-186.

Abstract

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L., was introduced from Europe into North America near Boston, Massachusetts, in 1869, and is now well established as a serious defoliator of forest, shade, and fruit trees over much of the eastern United States. Despite substantial efforts to eradicate, contain, or control this pest, the gypsy moth has persisted and continues to extend its range. The generally infested area currently extends from the northeast corner of North Carolina along a diagonal line that extends through Virginia, West Virginia, and the northeast corner of Ohio into Michigan. These five states are referred to as the transition zone, and states to the east of this line represent what is referred to as the generally infested area. A vast area of suitable habitat for the gypsy moth, much of which is valuable commercial hardwood forest, lies to the south and west of the generally infested area. This paper assumes that the gypsy moth will if not checked expand its range into that area and therefore proposes a management strategy for preventing this from occurring.

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Citation

McFadden, Max W.; McManus, Michael E. 1991. An insect out of control? The potential for spread and establishment of the gypsy moth in new forest areas in the United States. In: Baranchikov, Yuri N.; Mattson, William J.; Hain, Fred P.; Payne, Thomas L., eds. Forest Insect Guilds: Patterns of Interaction with Host Trees; 1989 August 13-17; Abakan, Siberia, U.S.S.R. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-153. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 172-186.

Last updated on: June 15, 2018