Publication Details

Growth and development of planted northern red oak on bulldozed skidroads after clearcutting in Appalachian hardwoods

Year Published

2006

Publication

Res. Pap. NE-730. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 16 p.

Abstract

Artificial regeneration of northern red oak in Appalachian clearcuts on mesic sites is hindered by accessibility and competition from developing vegetation. The use of skidroads as a planting medium was evaluated on two clearcuts with contrasting aspects in north central West Virginia. Stratified acorns were planted in tree shelters at three positions (cut, middle, fill) on the roadbed and one position (offroad) adjacent to the roadbed. Height growth, percent survival, competitive status, and potential crop trees were measured after eight growing seasons. Bulk density and percent soil moisture and organic matter also were measured. Height growth was greatest on the off-road and fill positions. The overall height difference (1.5 feet) between off-road and fill positions was less than expected from measurements of soil parameters. Roadbed bulk densities were highest at the cut and lowest at the fill positions. Bulk densities were lowest at the off-road positions. Roadbed moisture content remained about 40 percent lower than that at off-road positions throughout the year.

Citation

Kochenderfer, James N.; Adams, Mary Beth; Miller, Gary W.; Wood, Frederica 2006. Growth and development of planted northern red oak on bulldozed skidroads after clearcutting in Appalachian hardwoods. Res. Pap. NE-730. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 16 p. https://doi.org/10.2737/NE-RP-730.

Last updated on: December 7, 2006