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Mycorrhizal fungal community relationship to root nitrogen concentration over a regional atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient in the northeastern USA

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Lilleskov, Erik A.; Wargo, Philip M.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Vogt, Daniel J.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Canadian Journal of Forest Research 38:1260-1266

Abstract

Increased nitrogen (N) input has been found to alter ectomycorrhizal fungal communities over short deposition gradients and in fertilization experiments; however, its effects over larger spatial scales have not been determined. To address this gap, we reanalyzed data from a study originally designed to examine the effects of soil aluminum/calcium (Al/Ca) ratios on the vitality of red spruce fine roots over a regional acid and N deposition gradient in the northeastern USA. We used root N as an indicator of stand N availability and examined its relationship with the abundance of ectomycorrhizal morphotypes. The dominant morphotypes changed in relative abundance as a function of stand N availability. As root N concentrations increased, Piloderma spp. - like, Cenococcurn geophilum Fr., and other unidentified mycorrhizal morphotypes declined in abundance, while other smooth-mantled morphotypes increased. Root N concentration in the 1-2 mm diameter class was the best predictor of the abundance of multiple morphotypes. The morphotype responses were consistent with those found in experimental and small-scale studies, suggesting that N availability is altering ectomycorrhizal communities over broad spatial scales in this region. This finding provides an impetus to conduct a more detailed characterization of mycorrhizal community responses to N deposition across large-scale gradients.

Citation

Lilleskov, Erik A.; Wargo, Philip M.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Vogt, Daniel J. 2008. Mycorrhizal fungal community relationship to root nitrogen concentration over a regional atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient in the northeastern USA. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 38:1260-1266

Last updated on: August 21, 2008