Publication Details

Tree Survival and Growth Following Ice Storm Injury

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Year Published

2003

Publication

Res. Pap. NE-723. Newtown Squre, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 4 p.

Abstract

Nearly 25 million acres of forest from northwestern New York and southern Quebec to the south-central Maine coast were coated with ice from a 3-day storm in early January 1998. This storm was unusual in its size and the duration of icing. Trees throughout the region were injured as branches and stems broke and forks split under the weight of the ice. These injuries reduced the size of tree crowns and exposed wood to infection that can lead to wood decay.

In addition to regional assessments, forest managers need to know how much damage to expect in the years following the storm due to loss of wood quality, loss of tree growth, or tree death. The purpose of this study was to determine tree survival, stem growth, and response to infection following injury to major hardwood tree species from the 1998 ice storm.

Citation

Shortle, Walter C.; Smith, Kevin T.; Dudzik, Kenneth R. 2003. Tree Survival and Growth Following Ice Storm Injury. Res. Pap. NE-723. Newtown Squre, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 4 p. https://doi.org/10.2737/NE-RP-723.

Last updated on: August 22, 2006