Publication Details

Biomass and Nitrogen Budgets During Larval Development of Lymantria dispar and Choristoneura fumiferana: Allometric Relationships

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Year Published

1983

Publication

Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-85. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experimental Station: 133-141.

Abstract

Spruce budworm larvae grew faster than gypsy moth larvae both in a temporal and relative sense. The budworm larvae had a higher relative growth rate (RGR), biomass conversion efficiency (EGI), and nitrogen utilization efficiency (NOE) than the gypsy moth larvae. As both species matured, relative growth rates, rates of consumption, and conversion efficiencies declined. The differences between species and the decline in rates with maturation are, at least partially. allometric (related to body size). The relationship can be expressed by the equation y = aXb, where y is the rate of the process and X is the size of the animal. The importance of accounting for allometry when evaluating quantitative nutritional measurements is illustrated with budworm and gypsy moth.

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Citation

Montgomery, Michael E. 1983. Biomass and Nitrogen Budgets During Larval Development of Lymantria dispar and Choristoneura fumiferana: Allometric Relationships. In: Talerico, Robert L.; Montgomery, Michael, tech. coords. 1983. Proceedings, forest defoliator--host interactions; 1983 April 5-7; New Haven, CT: A comparison between gypsy moth and spruce budworms. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-85. Broomall, PA: U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experimental Station: 133-141 p.

Last updated on: May 21, 2018