Publication Details

Tapholes in sugar maples: What happens in the tree.

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Walters, Russell S.; Shigo, Alex L.

Year Published

1978

Publication

Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-47. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experimental Station, Broomall, PA. 12 p.

Abstract

Maple syrup production starts by drilling a taphole in the tree. This process injures the wood, which may become discolored or decayed as a result. If trees are to be tapped, every effort must be made to minimize injury while obtaining the desired amount of sap. Information about tapholes is given here for the benefit of the producer. Some important points discussed are: how trees compartmentalize discolored and decayed wood associated with tapholes, how some tapping procedures lead to cambial dieback around the hole, the problem of overtapping related to increased use of mechanical tappers, and new information on the use of para formaldehyde pills, which can lead to more decay in trees.

Citation

Walters, Russell S.; Shigo, Alex L. 1978. Tapholes in sugar maples: What happens in the tree. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-47. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experimental Station, Broomall, PA. 12 p.

Last updated on: January 13, 2011