Publication Details

Does having a hunter identity influence land management behaviors of family forest owners?

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Year Published

2021

Publication

Human Dimensions of Wildlife

Abstract

Hunters are often assumed to possess conservation and stewardship values. Research on whether these values translate into active land management is scant and inconclusive, particularly as it relates to family forest landowners (FFOs). We examined how strength of deer hunter identity is associated with land management behaviors and intentions of FFOs in Wisconsin. While identity as a construct has been found to inform behavior, the relationship between hunter identity and land management behaviors has not been examined. We found higher average hunter identity scores were associated with respondents who had cut trees for personal use, planted native seeds, developed/maintained trails or roads, have a management plan, participated in state landowner programs, and those with intentions to cut trees for sale, personal use, or to improve forest conditions; remove built-up plant material; conduct trail or road work; and jointly plan with others to enhance habitat for game species or motorized recreation.

Citation

Snyder, Stephanie A.; Floress, Kristin; Vokoun, Melinda. 2021. Does having a hunter identity influence land management behaviors of family forest owners?. Human Dimensions of Wildlife. 16 p. https://doi.org/10.1080/10871209.2020.1871124.

Last updated on: February 1, 2021