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Bioremediation and soils

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Zalesny, Ronald S.; Casler, Michael D.; Hallett, Richard ; Lin, Chung-Ho ; Pilipovic, Andrej

Year Published

2021

Publication

In: Stanturf, John A.; Callaham, Mac A., eds. Soils and Landscape Restoration. London: Academic Press: 237-273. Chapter 9.

Abstract

Land degradation resulting from anthropogenic activities worldwide has multiple and complex impacts on the global environment and public health through direct and indirect processes, which affects a wide array of ecosystem functions and services (Rodríguez-Eugenio et al., 2018). The pollution of soils and water caused by anthropogenic activities is often associated with modern urbanization, industrialization, and agricultural activities such as industrial mining of metals, extraction of petroleum oils and gas, landfill waste, and applications of pesticides and herbicides for food production. Soil pollution is one of the major effects of human technological advancement. A variety of pollutants affect topsoil and subsoil, including fuel and oil products, heavy metals, hydrocarbon waste, excessive nutrients (e.g., nitrate and phosphate), pesticides, and herbicides. Thousands of chemical pollutants, which are commercially produced on a large scale, are released into terrestrial and aquatic environments on a daily basis, resulting in about 33% of all global soils being at risk of degradation (Rodríguez-Eugenio et al., 2018). For example, agrichemicals, which can help meet the world's growing demand for food, lead to soil pollution and degraded agroecosystems.

Citation

Zalesny, Ronald S., Jr.; Casler, Michael D.; Hallett, Richard; Lin, Chung-Ho; Pilipovic, Andrej. 2021. Bioremediation and soils. In: Stanturf, John A.; Callaham, Mac A., eds. Soils and Landscape Restoration. London: Academic Press: 237-273. Chapter 9. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-813193-0.00009-6.

Last updated on: January 19, 2021