Publication Details

One size does not fit all: relationships between size of family forest holdings and landowner attitudes and behaviors

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Butler, Brett J.; Caputo, Jesse ; Robillard, Amanda L.; Sass, Emma M.; Sutherland, Christopher

Year Published

2020

Publication

Journal of Forestry. 17 p.

Abstract

An estimated 10 million families, individuals, trusts, and estates own 39 percent of the forestland in the United States, excluding interior Alaska. Using segmented regression, the relationships between size of forest holdings and the attitudes and behaviors of these family forest ownerships were tested using data from the 2018 iteration of the USDA Forest Service's National Woodland Owner Survey. All 16 variables tested have significant relationships with size of forest holdings, and 13 have one or more breakpoints, ranging from 40 to 5,854 ac, where the relationships between the variables change. Timber as a reason for owning, timber harvesting activities, management plan, advice received, land certified, tax program participation, cost share, recreation, land tenure, recreation, taxes and heirs as concerns, land transfer, and income from forestland have positive relationships with size of forest holdings; resident ownership has a negative relationship; and wildlife as a reason for owning and owner age have mixed relationships.

Keywords

family forest owners; National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS); United States (US; USA); USDA Forest Service; Forest Inventory and Analysis; segmented regression

Citation

Butler, Brett J.; Caputo, Jesse; Robillard, Amanda L.; Sass, Emma M.; Sutherland, Christopher. 2020. One size does not fit all: relationships between size of family forest holdings and landowner attitudes and behaviors. Journal of Forestry. 17 p. https://doi.org/10.1093/jofore/fvaa045.

Last updated on: December 15, 2020