Publication Details

Wetland and hydric soils

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Trettin, Carl C.; Kolka, Randall K.; Marsh, Anne S.; Bansal, Sheel ; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Megonigal, Patrick ; Stelk, Marla J.; Lockaby, Graeme ; D'Amore, David V; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Tangen, Brian ; Chimner, Rodney ; Gries, James

Year Published

2020

Publication

Forest and rangeland soils of the United States under changing conditions: A comprehensive science synthesis. Springer, Cham. p. 99-126

Abstract

Soil and the inherent biogeochemical processes in wetlands contrast starkly with those in upland forests and rangelands. The differences stem from extended periods of anoxia, or the lack of oxygen in the soil, that characterize wetland soils; in contrast, upland soils are nearly always oxic. As a result, wetland soil biogeochemistry is characterized by anaerobic processes, and wetland vegetation exhibits specific adaptations to grow under these conditions. However, many wetlands may also have periods during the year where the soils are unsaturated and aerated. This fluctuation between aerated and nonaerated soil conditions, along with the specialized vegetation, gives rise to a wide variety of highly valued ecosystem services.

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Citation

Trettin, Carl C.; Kolka, Randall K.; Marsh, Anne S.; Bansal, Sheel; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Megonigal, Patrick; Stelk, Marla J.; Lockaby, Graeme; D’Amore, David V.; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Tangen, Brian; Chimner, Rodney; Gries, James. 2020. Wetland and hydric soils. In: Pouyat, Richard V.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Patel-Weynand, Toral; Geiser, Linda H., editors. 2020. Forest and rangeland soils of the United States under changing conditions: A comprehensive science synthesis. Springer, Cham: 99-126. Chapter 6. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45216-2_6.

Last updated on: October 12, 2021