Publication Details

Eight years later, did a wildfire in southwestern Virginia accomplish first-entry prescribed fire tree regeneration objectives?

Publication Toolbox

  • Download PDF (1.0 MB)
  • This publication is available only online.
Hahn, George E.; Coates, T. Adam; Aust, W. Michael; Copenheaver, Carolyn A.; Thomas-Van Gundy, Melissa A.

Year Published

2020

Publication

e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station

Abstract

In the early 20th century, fire exclusion policies had unforeseen consequences on the forests of the Appalachian Mountains, including fuel accumulation and a shift in composition to more fireintolerant species (Nowacki and Abrams 2008, Waldrop and others 2016). The failure to regenerate desirable fire-adapted species, such as oaks (Quercus spp.) and Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens), led scientists and managers to consider the use of prescribed burning as a management tool to restore these species (Brose and others 2013).

Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Citation

Hahn, George E.; Coates, T. Adam; Aust, W. Michael; Copenheaver, Carolyn A.; Thomas-Van Gundy, Melissa A. 2020. Eight years later, did a wildfire in southwestern Virginia accomplish first-entry prescribed fire tree regeneration objectives? In: Bragg, Don C.; Koerth, Nancy E.; Holley, A. Gordon, eds. 2020. Proceedings of the 20th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 74-76.

Last updated on: September 15, 2020