Publication Details

White oak and red maple tree ring analysis reveals enhanced productivity in urban forest patches

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Sonti, Nancy F.; Hallett, Richard A.; Griffin, Kevin L.; Sullivan, Joe H.

Year Published

2019

Publication

Forest Ecology and Management

Abstract

The environmental conditions of urban ecosystems shape the health and well-being of all organisms living there. The growth and vitality of urban trees in the eastern United States (U.S.) is of particular interest as they are dominant organisms in urban landscapes and provide valuable biophysical and socio-cultural ecosystem services to urban residents. An understanding of past and present growth rates of trees in urban forest patches may provide insight into future ecosystem functioning of these urban green spaces as well as that of more rural ecosystems experiencing environmental change factors similar to those associated with urbanization (Ziska et al., 2003; Lahr et al., 2018). However, these changes in tree growth are likely to vary by species and across urban areas, reflecting the local environmental conditions associated with the trajectory of development in a city. Here, we examine growth rates of two native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern U.S. (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD).

Citation

Sonti, Nancy F.; Hallett, Richard A.; Griffin, Kevin L.; Sullivan, Joe H. 2019. White oak and red maple tree ring analysis reveals enhanced productivity in urban forest patches. Forest Ecology and Management. 453: 117626. 11 p. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2019.117626.

Last updated on: October 16, 2019