Publication Details

Adaptation of four Amorpha shrubs to four light levels

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Navarrete-Tindall, Nadia E.; Van Sambeek, J. W.; Kirk, Steven D.; McGraw, Robert L.

Year Published

2003

Publication

In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 203-205

Abstract

Native legumes can play an important role in natural ecosystems and in tree plantings as a source of nitrogen through their symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria. The genus Amorpha of the subfamily Papilionoideae within the Fabaceae contains 20 to 25 shrubby species native to North America (Wilbur 1975). Several species are documented as nodulated by rhizobial bacteria (Allen and Allen 1981, Navarrete-Tindall 1998).

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Citation

Navarrete-Tindall, Nadia E.; Van Sambeek, J. W.; Kirk, Steven D.; McGraw, Robert L. 2003. Adaptation of four Amorpha shrubs to four light levels. In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 203-205

Last updated on: February 1, 2007