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Chapter 10 - Wildfire and fire severity effects on post-fire carbon and nitrogen cycling in forest soil (Project NC-EM-F-14-1)

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Miesel, Jessica R.; Kolka, Randy ; Townsend, Phil

Year Published

2018

Publication

In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. 2018. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis 2017. General Technical Report SRS-233. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Pages 151-156.

Abstract

Fire is a key ecological driver in determining vegetation composition, biomass, and ecosystem dynamics in coniferous forests of the Laurentian Mixed Forest in the Great Lakes region (Cleland and others 2004, Frelich 1995). Regional projections of future climate conditions indicate warmer temperatures, more variable precipitation patterns, and greater moisture stress (Handler and others 2014). These conditions are likely to increase the occurrence of drought that in turn influences fire risk and severity (Clark 1989, Neary and others 2008). For example, a recent modeling investigation of relationships between future climate and wildland fire risk in the Great Lakes region showed that the expected changes in precipitation and temperature are associated with increased duration of conditions of high fire risk and earlier timing of the peak wildland fire season (Kerr and others 2016). Further, the 2011 Forest Health Monitoring Program’s national report identified a pattern of persistent and/or severe to extreme drought in recent previous years across the Laurentian Mixed Forest of the western Great Lakes region (Potter and Conkling 2013), and the 2011 Pagami Creek wildfire in northern Minnesota resulted from a lightning strike during these conditions.

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Citation

Miesel, Jessica R.; Kolka, Randy; Townsend, Phil. 2018. Chapter 10 - Wildfire and fire severity effects on post-fire carbon and nitrogen cycling in forest soil (Project NC-EM-F-14-1).In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. 2018. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis 2017. General Technical Report SRS-233. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Pages 151-156.

Last updated on: June 13, 2018