Publication Details

The importance of preserving genetic uniqueness in pitch pine restoration (Vermont)

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Hawley, Gary J.; Schaberg, Paul G.; DeHayes, Donald H.

Year Published

2002

Publication

Ecological Restoration. 20: 281-282.

Abstract

One of the few remaining populations of pitch pine (Pinus rigida) in Vermont is found at the northern extreme of its range at the Army National Guards' Camp Johnson in Colchester, where about 200-300 mature trees grow with very little natural regeneration. We believe this lack of regeneration is likely due to poor establishment conditions, most notably the suppression during the past 100 years of periodic fires that historically removed competition and prepared beds for seed germination and seedling establishment. We have also considered the possibility that high levels of inbreeding (common in small, isolated populations) have reduced fertility, growth, and survival within the stands.

Citation

Hawley, Gary J.; Schaberg, Paul G.; DeHayes, Donald H. 2002. The importance of preserving genetic uniqueness in pitch pine restoration (Vermont). Ecological Restoration. 20: 281-282.

Last updated on: July 30, 2008