Publication Details

An assessment of black locust in northern U.S. forests

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Year Published

2017

Publication

Res. Note NRS-248. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 5 p.

Abstract

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), a tree of the legume family (Fabaceae), is native to the southern Appalachian Mountains (Pennsylvania to Alabama), Ozark Plateau, and mid-south (Fig. 1). Black locust wood is utilized for firewood, fence posts, and building due to its strength and durability. The prolific pealike blossoms are aesthetically pleasing and provide nectar for bees and butterflies (Fig. 2). Within and outside of its native range, black locust has been extensively planted for ornamental purposes and land reclamation where its ability to fix nitrogen helps increase soil fertility. Except for reclamation, most forest managers consider this tree a weed species that can be a strong competitor against more desirable species (Czarapata 2005, Kaufman and Kaufman 2007, Huntley 1990).

Citation

Kurtz, Cassandra M.; Hansen, Mark H. 2017. An assessment of black locust in northern U.S. forests. Res. Note NRS-248. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 5 p. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-248.

Last updated on: September 8, 2017