Publication Details

Do rising temperatures always increase forest productivity? Interacting effects of temperature, precipitation, cloudiness and soil texture on tree species growth and competition

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Year Published

2017

Publication

Environmental Modelling & Software

Abstract

Forest landscape models (FLM) are increasingly used to project the effects of climate change on forested landscapes, yet most use phenomenological approaches with untested assumptions about future forest dynamics. We used a FLM that relies on first principles to mechanistically simulate growth (LANDIS-II with PnET-Succession) to systematically explore how landscapes composed of tree species with various life history traits respond to individual climate and abiotic drivers. Moderate temperature rise (+3 °C) concurrent with rising CO2 concentration increased net photosynthesis of cohorts, but decreased biomass production because of increased maintenance respiration costs. However, an increase of 6 °C decreased both photosynthesis and biomass production, regardless of species optimal temperature. Increasing precipitation generally increased photosynthesis and biomass. Reduced cloudiness had a positive effect on photosynthesis and biomass, but much less than the other treatment factors. Our study informs expectations for the outcome of modeling studies that project forest futures under climate change.

Citation

Gustafson, Eric J.; Miranda, Brian R.; De Bruijn, Arjan M.G.; Sturtevant, Brian R.; Kubiske, Mark E. 2017. Do rising temperatures always increase forest productivity? Interacting effects of temperature, precipitation, cloudiness and soil texture on tree species growth and competition. Environmental Modelling & Software. 97: 171-183. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2017.08.001.

Last updated on: August 30, 2017