Publication Details

How does temperature affect forest "fungus breath"? Diurnal non-exponential temperature-respiration relationship, and possible longer-term acclimation in fungal sporocarps

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Year Published

2017

Publication

Fungal Ecology

Abstract

Fungal respiration contributes substantially to ecosystem respiration, yet its field temperature response is poorly characterized. I hypothesized that at diurnal time scales, temperature-respiration relationships would be better described by unimodal than exponential models, and at longer time scales both Q10 and mass-specific respiration at 10 °C (Rms10) would show signs of acclimation. I measured respiration on intact sporocarps over the course of several days, and modeled temperature-respiration relationships using exponential and unimodal Gaussian functions. Unimodal models provided a better fit than exponential models. Rms10 and Q10 also declined with increasing temperature, consistent with longerterm temperature acclimation. There was some evidence of diurnal hysteresis. When exponential models were appropriate, Q10 values averaged ∼3.5, and Rms10 averaged 0.02 µmol CO2 g-1 sec-1. The observed high mass-specific respiration rates, peaked temperature responses, decline in Rms10 and Q10 with increasing temperature, and hysteresis could contribute to observed non-exponential and hysteretic patterns in soil and ecosystem respiration.

Keywords

Acclimation; Ectomycorrhizal fungi; Exponential regression; Fungal mass-specific respiration; Gaussian regression; Hysteresis; Q10; Root respiration

Citation

Lilleskov, Erik A. 2017. How does temperature affect forest "fungus breath"? Diurnal non-exponential temperature-respiration relationship, and possible longer-term acclimation in fungal sporocarps. Fungal Ecology. 27: 24-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.funeco.2017.02.001.

Last updated on: April 28, 2017