Publication Details

Gypsy moth in the southeastern U.S.: Biology, ecology, and forest management strategies

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​Kauffman, Bruce W.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Liebhold, Andrew M.; Coyle, David R.

Year Published

2017

Publication

SREF-FH-008. Athens, GA: Southern Regional Extension Forestry. 10 p.

Abstract

The European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) is a non-native insect that was accidentally introduced to North America in 1869 when it escaped cultivation by a French amateur entomologist living near Boston, MA. Despite early efforts to eradicate the species, it became established throughout eastern Massachusetts. Since then, the gypsy moth has expanded its range throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions, west to the Lake States (Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Illinois), Indiana, Ohio, and into the central Appalachian Mountains (West Virginia and Virginia). Gypsy moth populations have recently established in North Carolina, and moths are annually captured in Kentucky and eastern Tennessee, though no established populations exist (Fig. 1). Adult gypsy moths are occasionally captured in Georgia and South Carolina.

Citation

​Kauffman, Bruce W.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Liebhold, Andrew M.; Coyle, David R. 2017. Gypsy moth in the southeastern U.S.: Biology, ecology, and forest management strategies. SREF-FH-008. Athens, GA: Southern Regional Extension Forestry. 10 p.

Last updated on: March 21, 2017