Publication Details

Exploring the ecology of suburban wildlife

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DeStefano, Stephen; DeGraaf, Richard M.

Year Published

2003

Publication

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 1(2):) 95-101.

Abstract

The fringes of cities, and rural properties within commuting distance of cities, experience some of the est rates of development in the world. This can cause dramatic changes to the landscape, the alteration logical functions, and a reduction in biodiversity. With the spread of suburbia, however, come opportunities for some species to exploit new resources. While many wild creatures can enrich the lives of suburban dwellers, large increases in the populations of species such as deer, beaver, and coyotes can lead to a change in status from resource to pest. For several decades, wildlife managers have alternately embraced and issues related to urban and suburban wildlife. Today, management of suburban areas challenges wildlife agencies on two fronts: the threat to habitat and biodiversity and the problem of "overabundant" wildlife. This is not only a tremendous management challenge, but also an educational opportunity to help people understand the natural world and their place in it.

Citation

DeStefano, Stephen; DeGraaf, Richard M. 2003. Exploring the ecology of suburban wildlife. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 1(2):) 95-101.

Last updated on: January 13, 2017