Publication Details

Decay, defects and condition of street trees in four Upstate New York cities

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Luley, Christopher J.; Nowak, David J.; Greenfield, Eric J.

Year Published

2009

Publication

City Trees. March/April: 22-25.

Abstract

Throughout most of New York State, maple species are the most common street tree. It is not unusual for Norway (Acer platanoides), silver (A. saccharinum), sugar (A. saccharum), red (A. rubrum), and other maples species to comprise over 50% of the street tree population in communities of all sizes. As in many areas of the country, maples on the streets today were planted to replace the American elms (Ulmus americana) that were lost as a result of the Dutch Elm Disease epidemic that started in the 1930s. Many cities in New York are therefore faced with an aging population of maples that make up a substantial portion of their street tree populations. The cities we selected for this study of decay and tree health were Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. These cities are the largest in upstate New York and together have over 67,000 trees that are greater than 12 inches in diameter. They are also typical of other communities in the state in that Norway maple is over 36% of the large tree population and maples species together comprise over 54% of large-diameter street trees.

Citation

Luley, Christopher J.; Nowak, David J.; Greenfield, Eric J. 2009. Decay, defects and condition of street trees in four Upstate New York cities. City Trees. March/April: 22-25.

Last updated on: October 4, 2016