Publication Details

Scleroderris canker on National Forests in Upper Michigan and Northern Wisconsin.

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Skilling, Darroll D.; Cordell, Charles E.

Year Published

1966

Publication

Research Paper NC-3. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station

Abstract

Scleroderris canker, a disease caused by the fungus Scleroderris lagerbergii Gremmen, has a long history of injuries to young pine plantations and nurseries in Europe. It was recently identified as the cause of serious damage in the Lake States. During the summer and fall of 1965, a survey was conducted in Upper Michigan and northern Wisconsin to determine the distribution and intensity of Scleroderris canker in 2- to 10-year old red and jack pine plantations on National Forest land. The results showed that Scleroderris canker was widespread over the Ottawa and Hiawatha National Forests in Upper Michigan and the Nicolet and Chequamegon National Forests in northern Wisconsin. The disease is present and causing mortality on every Ranger District where red or jack pine have been planted since 1955. The fungus was found on 55% of the red pine plantations and 86% of the jack pine plantations sampled on the four forests. Mortality in these red and jack pine plantations averaged 40 and 39%, respectively.

Keywords

Scleroderris lagerbergii Gremmen, red pine, jack pine, plantation

Citation

Skilling, Darroll D.; Cordell, Charles E. 1966. Scleroderris canker on National Forests in Upper Michigan and Northern Wisconsin. Research Paper NC-3. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station

Last updated on: August 11, 2006