Publication Details

The impact of traditional fire management on soil carbon and nitrogen pools in a montane forest, southern Ethiopia

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Kim, Dong-Gill; Taddese, Habitamu; Belay, Abrham; Kolka, Randy

Year Published

2016

Publication

International Journal of Wildland Fire. 7 p.

Abstract

We conducted studies to assess the impact of traditional fire management on soil organic carbon and total nitrogen pools. We compared organic carbon and total nitrogen pools in forest floor and mineral soil (0–100-cm depth) in three areas burned by local communities (B) with adjacent unburned areas (UB) (three paired sites; 1, 5 and 9 years since fire; hereafter B1-UB, B5-UB and B9-UB) in a montane forest in southern Ethiopia. Despite differences in time since fire and dominant post-fire vegetation, forest floor and mineral soil organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations and pools were not significantly different between burned and unburned pairs or across sites. However, mineral soil carbon : nitrogen ratio was significantly higher in the burned area of B9-UB (0–10 cm) and B5-UB (10–20 cm), indicating small losses of nitrogen relative to carbon, likely from plant uptake or possibly leaching of nitrogen post fire. Combined, the data suggest that traditional fire management did not dramatically affect forest floor and mineral soil organic carbon and total nitrogen dynamics at these sites.

Keywords

C :N ratio, forest floor, mineral soil layers, Wondo Genet Forest

Citation

Kim, Dong-Gill; Taddese, Habitamu; Belay, Abrham; Kolka, Randy. 2016. The impact of traditional fire management on soil carbon and nitrogen pools in a montane forest, southern Ethiopia. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 7 p. https://doi.org/10.1071/WF16022.

Last updated on: July 22, 2016