Publication Details

Effects of habitat on stand productivity in the White Mountains of New Hampshire

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Year Published

1979

Publication

Res. Pap. NE-452. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 8p.

Abstract

Mean annual biomass production of sapling stands was higher on washed tills, which have a hardwood climax, than on habitats having a softwood climax. However, biomass production of poletimber stands did not differ significantly among habitats. Apparently, differences among habitats in characteristics species composition tends to mask differences in biomass productivity. Demanding species growing on a good site will produce about the same biomass as less demanding species growing on a medium site. Mean diameter growth of sugar maple and yellow birch was much better on fine till and enriched habitats than on the other habitats covered by the study; and preliminary results from older stands indicate that board-foot production is much higher on the better habitats. In conducting intensive silvicultural operations, it is important to favor species well adapted to habitat.

Citation

Leak, William B. 1979. Effects of habitat on stand productivity in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Res. Pap. NE-452. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 8p.

Last updated on: June 15, 2006