Publication Details

Development of a fine scale smoke dispersion modeling system. Part II: Case study of a prescribed burn in the New Jersey Pine Barrens

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Year Published

2011

Publication

In: Ninth symposium on fire and forest meteorology; 17-20 October 2011; Palm Springs, CA. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society. 5 p.

Abstract

Smoke dispersion from wildland fires is a critical health and safety issue, impacting air quality and visibility across a broad range of space and time scales. Predicting the dispersion of smoke from low-intensity fires is particularly challenging due to the fact that it is highly sensitive to factors such as near-surface meteorological conditions, local topography, vegetation, and atmospheric turbulence within and above vegetation layers. Prescribed fires are useful tools for forest ecology and management and generally are low in intensity, confined to small areas, and capable of producing smoke that may linger in an area for extended periods of time. Existing integrated smoke dispersion modeling systems, which are designed for predictions of smoke from multiple sources on a regional scale [e.g., BlueSky (Larkin et al., 2009)], do not have the necessary resolution to accurately capture smoke from low-intensity fires that tends to meander around the source and may stay underneath forest canopies for a relatively long period of time. Simple dispersion models [e.g., SASEM, VSMOKE (Riebau et al., 1988; Lavdas, 1996)], which typically are location specific, are limited by their simplistic nature in treating the emissions source, topography, canopy, and the atmospheric conditions.

Citation

Kiefer, Michael T.; Heilman, Warren E.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Charney, Joseph J.; Bian, X.; Shadbolt, Ryan P.; Hom, John; Clark, Kenneth; Skowronski, Nicholas; Gallagher, Michael; Patterson, Matthew. 2011. Development of a fine scale smoke dispersion modeling system. Part II: Case study of a prescribed burn in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. In: Ninth symposium on fire and forest meteorology; 17-20 October 2011; Palm Springs, CA. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society. https://ams.confex.com/ams/9FIRE/webprogram/Paper192199.html

Last updated on: May 12, 2015