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Leading edge gypsy moth population dynamics

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Carter, M. R.; Ravlin, F. W.; McManus, M. L.

Year Published

1991

Publication

IN: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Twery, Mark J.; Smith, Shirley I., eds. Proceedings, U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency gypsy moth research review 1990; East Windsor, CT. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-146. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 49.

Abstract

Leading edge gypsy moth populations have been the focus of several intervention programs (MDIPM, AIPM). Knowledge of gypsy moth population dynamics in leading edge area is crucial for effective management. Populations in these areas tend to reach outbreak levels (noticeable defoliation) within three to four years after egg masses are first detected. Pheromone traps have proven effective for detection and estimating population density in building populations. However, after populations have reached outbreak levels the utility of pheromone traps is decreased, primarily due to trap saturation. The emphasis of our research has been to investigate several aspects of gypsy moth biology with the objective of identifying characteristics that would be useful to monitor populations. We have focused on quantifying the impact of defoliation on several life history attributes.

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Citation

Carter, M. R.; Ravlin, F. W.; McManus, M. L. 1991. Leading edge gypsy moth population dynamics. IN: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Twery, Mark J.; Smith, Shirley I., eds. Proceedings, U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency gypsy moth research review 1990; East Windsor, CT. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-146. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 49.

Last updated on: July 7, 2008