Publication Details

Lattice and compact family block designs in forest genetics

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Snyder, E. Bayne

Year Published

1966

Publication

In: Joint Proceedings of the Second Genetics Workshop of the Society of American Foresters and the Seventh Lake States Forest Tree Improvement Conference; Res. Pap. NC-6. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 12-17

Abstract

One of the principles of experimental design is that replicates be relatively homogeneous. Thus, in forest research a replicate is often assigned to a single crew for planting in a single day on a uniform site. When treatments are numerous, a large area is required per replication, and homogeneity of site is difficult to achieve. In this situation, crop scientists (LeClerg et al. 1962) frequently divide the replicate into sub-blocks. The most used of the incomplete block designs are the lattices. Another type of incomplete block designs, the compact family block (Hutchinson and Panse 1937; Federer 1955) - essentially a split-plot design with genetic rather than cultural whole plots - has also been advocated for certain genetic materials.

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Citation

Snyder, E. Bayne. 1966. Lattice and compact family block designs in forest genetics. In: Joint Proceedings of the Second Genetics Workshop of the Society of American Foresters and the Seventh Lake States Forest Tree Improvement Conference; Res. Pap. NC-6. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 12-17

Last updated on: August 11, 2006