Publication Details

Allometric biomass models and applications for branches of Chinese tallow in a Mississippi Bottomland Forest

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Stoklosa, Allison M.; Tian, Nana; Fan, Zhaofei

Year Published

2015

Publication

In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e?Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS?203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 4 p.

Abstract

Chinese tallow [Triadica sebifera (L.) Small, formerly Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.] is a non-native invader moving through the southeastern United States. Tallow can invade a multitude of habitats, from coastal prairies to closed-canopy forests, forming monospecific stands and driving out native flora and fauna (Bruce and others 1997). Tallow has large impacts, both economically and ecologically, and is a growing concern among ecologists, landowners, and the public alike. An understanding of the ecology and biology of tallow, along with its effects on forest alteration, is necessary for any attempt at control to be successful. This paper aims to establish an accurate model for the branch biomass of Chinese tallow to be used in additive modeling and as a tool in future field research under the hypothesis that biomass increases with diameter and length.

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Citation

Stoklosa, Allison M.; Tian, Nana; Fan, Zhaofei. 2015. Allometric biomass models and applications for branches of Chinese tallow in a Mississippi Bottomland Forest. In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 4 p.

Last updated on: February 12, 2015