Publication Details

Estimating bark thicknesses of common Appalachian hardwoods

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Year Published

2014

Publication

In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 283-294.

Abstract

Knowing the thickness of bark along the stem of a tree is critical to accurately estimate residue and, more importantly, estimate the volume of solid wood available. Determining the volume or weight of bark for a log is important because bark and wood mass are typically separated while processing logs, and accurate determination of volume is problematic. Bark thickness is known to vary with species, tree diameter, and location along the stem. This paper examines the bark thicknesses of four Appalachian hardwoods: red oak (Quercus rubra), white oak (Quercus alba), yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Using bark thickness measurements from multiple sites, average bark thickness by stem diameter and sample height location were determined. In addition, models were developed that predict bark thickness based on measured diameter outside the bark.

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Citation

Thomas, R. Edward; Bennett, Neal D. 2014. Estimating bark thicknesses of common Appalachian hardwoods. In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 283-294.

Last updated on: January 22, 2015