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History of black walnut genetics research in North America

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Victory, Erin; Woeste, Keith; Rhodes, Olin E., Jr.

Year Published

2004

Publication

In: Michler, C.H.; Pijut, P.M.; Van Sambeek, J.W.; Coggeshall, M.V.; Seifert, J.; Woeste, K.; Overton, R.; Ponder, F., Jr., eds. Proceedings of the 6th Walnut Council Research Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-243. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 1-8

Abstract

Eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) is an economically and ecologically important hardwood species that has been used throughout the history of settlement in North America. It was a resource that helped Native Americans in their everyday life, it helped European settlers carve a living out of the wilderness, and it has helped rural farmers and private landowners subsist and invest in the future. Described here is a brief history of black walnut breeding and molecular genetics research. Current genetic research may ultimately lead to the domestication of black walnut, an event that would be a hallmark for forest tree species.

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Citation

Victory, Erin; Woeste, Keith; Rhodes, Olin E., Jr. 2004. History of black walnut genetics research in North America. In: Michler, C.H.; Pijut, P.M.; Van Sambeek, J.W.; Coggeshall, M.V.; Seifert, J.; Woeste, K.; Overton, R.; Ponder, F., Jr., eds. Proceedings of the 6th Walnut Council Research Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-243. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 1-8

Last updated on: August 11, 2006