Publication Details

Selective cutting, rehabilitation, and alternatives for forests of northeastern North America and elsewhere

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Year Published

2014

Publication

Journal of Forestry. 112(3): 259-260.

Abstract

In the 1928 Journal of Forestry, Marinus Westveld commented that logging in the Northeast dating to the mid-1800s had been selective cutting that removed desirable species of large sizes. Later, commercial clearcuts removed progressively smaller trees of merchantable quality and desirable species. Indiscriminate logging damaged young growing stock and regeneration, and residual stands were poorly stocked with low-quality trees of undesirable species (Westveld 1928). Today, selective cutting remains widespread throughout many of the natural forests of northeastern North America (e.g., Fajvan et al. 1998, McGill et al. 2004, Stringer 2008, Munsell et al. 2009). The term is often incorrectly used to suggest some form of unevenaged management. However, the Society of American Foresters (SAF) defines selective cutting as partial cutting and specifies that it "should not be confused with cutting done in accordance with the selection method" of silviculture (Helms 1998).

Citation

Kenefic, Laura S. 2014. Selective cutting, rehabilitation, and alternatives for forests of northeastern North America and elsewhere. Journal of Forestry. 112(3): 259-260. https://doi.org/10.5849/jof.13-036.

Last updated on: September 4, 2014