Publication Details

Growth and stocking of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) in New England

Publication Toolbox

  • Download PDF (390784)
  • This publication is available only online.
Solomon, Dale S.; Leak, William B.

Year Published

2000

Publication

In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 43-49.

Abstract

Summarization of the limited growth information in mixed-species stands in New England indicates that eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) may be one of the fastest growing species in diameter, second only to white pine. However, on some sites hemlock diameter growth is about equal to that of associated hardwoods. Hemlock grows slowly in height and often endures long periods of suppression, which limits the usefulness of site index curves. Suppressed trees, once released, may grow relatively faster than non-suppressed trees. Hemlock stands attain high basal areas per acre, up to 240 square feet per acre, and recommended residual basal areas after thinning range from 100 to 140 square feet. Volumes may be as high as 4,500 cubic feet in 100-year-old stands, much higher than hardwood stands; however, both hemlock and hardwoods attain similar aboveground dry weights of about 85 tons per acre.

Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Citation

Solomon, Dale S.; Leak, William B. 2000. Growth and stocking of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) in New England. In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 43-49.

Last updated on: June 25, 2008