Publication Details

Effects of clearcutting, patch cutting, and low-density shelterwoods on breeding birds and tree regeneration in New Hampshire northern hardwoods

Year Published

2014

Publication

Res. Pap. NRS- 26. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 15 p.

Abstract

Clearcutting is an effective regeneration practice for northern hardwoods in New England. However, in esthetically sensitive areas forest managers sometimes use methods that soften the visual impact, such as smaller clearcuts (patch cuts) or low-density shelterwoods. It is unclear if these methods produce the same effects as clearcuts on tree regeneration and breeding bird habitat. A comparison of a 15-acre clearcut, four patch cuts varying in size from 2.9 to 5.5 acres, and a 34-acre low-density shelterwood showed that the patches regenerated some early successional tree species, similar to the clearcut, however, the smaller 3-acre patches also produced a higher component of beech and less pin cherry. The shelterwood produced high proportions of beech and striped maple. Early successional, generalists, and mid-/later successional birds were present in all three treatment areas although the clearcut and patches had higher proportions and more observations of early successional bird species.

Citation

Yamasaki, Mariko; Costello, Christine A.; Leak, William B. 2014. Effects of clearcutting, patch cutting, and low-density shelterwoods on breeding birds and tree regeneration in New Hampshire northern hardwoods. Res. Pap. NRS- 26. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 15 p. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RP-26.

Last updated on: August 27, 2014