Publication Details

Pin cherry effects on Allegheny hardwood stand development

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Year Published

1999

Publication

Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 29: 73-84.

Abstract

Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica L.) develops an early height advantage over associated species. Data from three long-term studies, extending up to 70 years after complete overstory removal, were used to evaluate the effects of pin cherry density on associates. Survival of seedling-origin stems of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) at age 15 decreased as the density of pin cherry >1.5 m tall at age 3 increased. The regression of pin cherry with black cherry was particularly strong (R = 0.632). Height of the tallest black cherry and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) at age 15 also decreased. If the density of pin cherry at age 3 was > 1 stem > 1.5 m tall per 0.0004 ha (high density), the number of black cherry fell below full stocking at age 15. When pin cherry occurred in high density, it lived longer than when it occurred at low density (< 1 stem > 1.5 m tall per 0.0004 ha). High pin cherry density early in stand development delayed the time when shade-intolerant and shade-intermediate species reached a stable proportion of the total basal area. In the long term, pin cherry reduced stand diameter and volume growth, particularly of black cherry.

Citation

Ristau, Todd E.; Horsley, Stephen B. 1999. Pin cherry effects on Allegheny hardwood stand development. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 29: 73-84.

Last updated on: June 20, 2008