Publication Details

Evolutionary consequences of putative intra- and interspecific hybridiation in agaric fungi

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Hughes, Karen W.; Petersen, Ronald H.; Lodge, D. Jean; Bergemann, Sarah E.; Baumgartner, Kendra; Tulloss, Rodham E.; Lickey, Edgar; Cifuentes, Joaquin

Year Published

2013

Publication

Mycologia. 105(6): 1577-1594.

Abstract

Agaric fungi of the southern Appalachian Mountains including Great Smoky Mountains National Park are often heterozygous for the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) with .42% of collections showing some heterozygosity for indels and/or base-pair substitutions. For these collections, intra-individual haplotype divergence is typically less than 2%, but for 3% of these collections intra-individual haplotype divergence exceeds that figure. We hypothesize that high intra-individual haplotype divergence is due to hybridization between agaric fungi with divergent haplotypes, possibly migrants from geographically isolated glacial refugia. Four species with relatively high haplotype divergence were examined: Armillaria mellea, Amanita citrina f. lavendula, Gymnopus dichrous and the Hygrocybe flavescens/chlorophana complex. The ITS region was sequenced, haplotypes of heterozygotes were resolved through cloning, and phylogenetic analyses were used to determine the outcome of hybridization events. Within Armillaria mellea and Amanita citrinalavendula, we found evidence of interbreeding and recombination.

Keywords

biodiversity, Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility, hybridization, speciation

Citation

Hughes, Karen W.; Petersen, Ronald H.; Lodge, D. Jean; Bergemann, Sarah E.; Baumgartner, Kendra; Tulloss, Rodham E.; Lickey, Edgar; Cifuentes, Joaquin. 2013. Evolutionary consequences of putative intra- and interspecific hybridiation in agaric fungi. Mycologia. 105(6): 1577-1594.​ https://doi.org/10.3852/13-041.

Last updated on: May 9, 2014