Publication Details

Tree survival 15 years after the ice storm of January 1998

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Year Published

2014

Publication

Res. Pap. NRS-25. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 4 p.

Abstract

The regional ice storm of early January 1998 was a widespread disturbance for millions of acres of forest in northeastern New York, northern New England, and southern Quebec. Tree crowns were partially or totally lost as stems snapped and branches broke with the weight of the deposited ice. We tracked the effect of crown injury on a large sample of northern hardwood trees within the storm footprint. Comparisons of tree survivorship from 5 to 15 years after the storm showed that paper birch was most sensitive to storm impact followed by yellow birch. Root-rot disease present prior to the storm was associated with the high mortality of birch. Although dramatic, mortality associated with the storm during this period was consistent with mortality expected from normal stand development of northern hardwoods as illustrated by the hardwood stocking chart.

Citation

Shortle, Walter C.; Smith, Kevin T.; Dudzik, Kenneth R. 2014. Tree survival 15 years after the ice storm of January 1998. Res. Pap. NRS-25. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 4 p. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RP-25.

Last updated on: February 23, 2015