Publication Details

The influence of inoculated and native ectomycorrhizal fungi on morphology, physiology and survival of American chestnut

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Bauman, Jenise M.; Keiffer, Carolyn H.; Hiremath, Shiv

Year Published

2011

Publication

In: Barnhisel, R.I., ed. Proceedings of the 2011 National meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation; 2011 June 11-16; Bismarck, ND. ASMR, Lexington, KY: 16-37.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of five different species of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi on root colonization of native fungi on putatively blight resistant chestnut hybrids (Castanea dentata x C. mollissima) in a reclaimed mine site in central Ohio. The five species were Hebeloma crustuliniforme, Laccaria bicolor, Scleroderma polyrhizum, Amanita rubescens, and Suillus luteus. We used a combination of DNA sequencing of the ITS region and phylogenetic analyses to indentify fungi found on roots after 12 and 18 months in the field. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordinations were used to determine if ECM community composition was influenced by the fungal inoculum used. The results of this study demonstrated that the selected ECM species do not persist on chestnut after one year in the field. In addition, these selected ECM species did not impede natural root colonization of native fungi or influence ECM community composition after two growing seasons. Although these species did not persist in the field, the presence of ECM inoculum (with the exception of Amanita) greatly contributed to the survival of hybrid chestnut seedlings. Therefore, introduced inoculum that was present in the very early stages of outplanting had persisting effects with regard to seedling establishment in the field, even if the original inoculum did not persist. ECM fungi native to the area colonized chestnuts resulting in increased growth rates. These native assemblages may contain species better able to form functional mycorrhizas under these environmental extremes. Therefore, the conservation of these species may be necessary to facilitate long-term survival of deciduous tree species historically native to these lands.

Keywords

root colonization of fungi; chestnut restoration

Citation

Bauman, Jenise M.; Keiffer, Carolyn H.; Hiremath, Shiv. 2011. The influence of inoculated and native ectomycorrhizal fungi on morphology, physiology and survival of American chestnut. In: Barnhisel, R.I., ed. Proceedings of the 2011 National meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation. Reclamation; 2011 June 11-16; Bismarck, ND. ASMR, Lexington, KY: 16-37.

Last updated on: October 21, 2013