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Long-term research -- why do we do it?

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Year Published

2013

Publication

In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: iii.

Abstract

While jotting down some notes for this forword, I’m also thinking about how the day was spent in the upper elevations of the Bartlett Experimental Forest planning out a monitoring scheme for an early upper-slope harvest in an oak stand. The previous several weeks were spent in relocating cruise lines for some 450-500 permanent plots established in 1931-32. And it’s time to resurvey several compartments under management since the mid-50's. My associates are conducting small mammal surveys, underway for 20 years or so, in a variety of managed and unmanaged compartments. Annual breeding bird surveys, also conducted for a couple of decades, were just completed. Dedicated research folks across the nation, and beyond, are engaged in similar longterm research activities. The work is often arduous and by organizational/agency metrics - numbers of journal articles and plush grant support - sometimes unrewarding. Why do we do it?

Citation

Leak, Bill. 2013. Long-term research -- why do we do it?. In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: iii.

Last updated on: September 9, 2013