Publication Details

Relationships among climate, forests, and insects in North America: Examples of the importance of long-term and broad-scale perspectives

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Year Published

2013

Publication

In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: 161-177.

Abstract

Forest structure is strongly influenced by disturbance, agents of which can include fire, weather, mammals, annelids, fungi, insects, and increasingly with the advent of the Anthropocene, climate. Currently, climate change represents one of the broadest threats to natural systems, including forests, with the potential to directly alter forest structure and function through mechanisms such as drought induced tree mortality (Allen et al., 2010), changes in tree species distribution (Allen and Breshears, 1998; Neilson and Marks, 1994), density (Allen et al., 2010), and composition (Allen and Breshears, 1998; Mueller et al., 2005). Although the direct effects of climate on trees often produce the most readily apparent changes to forested systems (i.e. tree mortality), climatic variation has the potential to indirectly alter forests by changing community interactions, including mycorrhizal associations (Gehring et al., 1998; Gehring and Whitham, 1994), insect outbreak dynamics (McCloskey et al., 2009; Otvos et al., 1979; Santos and Whitham, 2010; White, 1976), and arthropod community structure (Trotter III, 2008).

Citation

Trotter, Talbot. 2013. Relationships among climate, forests, and insects in North America: Examples of the importance of long-term and broad-scale perspectives. In: Camp, Ann E.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Carroll, Charles J.W. Long-term silvicultural and ecological studies. Results for science and management: volume 2.GISF Res. Pap. 013. New Haven, CT: Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry: 161-177.

Last updated on: September 9, 2013