Publication Details

The influence of trade associations and group certification programs on the hardwood certification movement

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Year Published

2013

Publication

In: Miller, Gary W.; Schuler, Thomas M.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Brooks, John R.; Grushecky, Shawn T.; Spong, Ben D.; Rentch, James S., eds. Proceedings, 18th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2012 March 26-28; Morgantown, WV; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-117. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 113-128.

Abstract

Forest certification has gained momentum around the world over the past two decades. Although there are advantages to being certified, many forest landowners and forest products manufacturers consider forest certification of U.S. forest and forest products unnecessary. Many believe that U.S. forests are already sustainably managed, the current certification systems are not trustworthy, and certification programs, in their current state, are too costly. To promote the sustainability of U.S. forests and address issues that landowners and forest products manufacturers have with certification, governmental agencies, trade associations, and environmental agencies have become involved in the certification movement. These organizations assist landowners and manufacturers by creating group certification programs and providing information and tools necessary to obtain certification. In 2009, a study was conducted to determine how the involvement of governmental agencies, trade associations, and environmental agencies influenced the certification movement. Research was conducted through a mail-based survey to 1,239 primary hardwood manufacturers in the Appalachian Region and through case studies of the Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc., (AHMI) Association, the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA), and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Results indicated that these entities were instrumental in increasing the awareness of certification and providing the tools their members need to become certified. Through the programs implemented by these entities, the supply of certified raw material and the number of certified forest products manufacturers has increased.

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Citation

Montague, Iris B. 2013. The influence of trade associations and group certification programs on the hardwood certification movement. In: Miller, Gary W.; Schuler, Thomas M.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Brooks, John R.; Grushecky, Shawn T.; Spong, Ben D.; Rentch, James S., eds. Proceedings, 18th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2012 March 26-28; Morgantown, WV; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-117. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 113-128.

Last updated on: September 17, 2013