Publication Details

Role of polyamines in DNA synthesis of Catharanthus roseus cells grown in suspension culture

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Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C.; Komamine, Atsushi; Shortle, Walter C.

Year Published

1990

Publication

In: Flores H.E.; Arteca R.N.; Shannon J.C., eds. Polyamines and ethylene: biochemistry, physiology and interactions. Rockville, MD: American Society of Plant Physiologists: 343-345.

Abstract

The requirement for polyamines in the proliferation of cells was first demonstrated in bacteria (3). While significant progress has been made in this field using animal cell cultures, only preliminary studies have been reported with plant tissues. Serafini-Fracassini et al. (9) showed a marked increase in polyamine synthesis early during the G 1 phase, concomitant with the synthesis of RNA, following the break of dormancy in Helianthus tuberosus tuber tissue. A second phase of polyamine accumulation began during the progression of S phase. Torrigiani et al. (10) and Phillips et al. (7) later showed that all major polyamines peaked during the G 1 phase. This increase in polyamines was preceded by increased ODC and ADC activities. An understanding of the mechanism of regulation of cell division requires a biochemical analysis of the progression of the cell cycle. To achieve this it is essential to have a synchronously dividing mass of cells.

Citation

Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C.; Komamine, Atsushi; Shortle, Walter C. 1990. Role of polyamines in DNA synthesis of Catharanthus roseus cells grown in suspension culture. In: Flores H.E.; Arteca R.N.; Shannon J.C., eds. Polyamines and ethylene: biochemistry, physiology and interactions. Rockville, MD: American Society of Plant Physiologists: 343-345.

Last updated on: June 6, 2013