Publication Details

Canopy gap size influences niche partitioning of the ground-layer plant community in a northern temperate forest

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Kern, Christel C.; Montgomery, Rebecca A.; Reich, Peter B.; Strong, Terry F.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of plant Ecology. 6(1): 101-112.

Abstract

The Gap Partitioning Hypothesis (GPH) posits that gaps create heterogeneity in resources crucial for tree regeneration in closed-canopy forests, allowing trees with contrasting strategies to coexist along resource gradients. Few studies have examined gap partitioning of temperate, ground-layer vascular plants. We used a ground-layer plant community of a temperate deciduous forest in northern Wisconsin, USA, as a model system to test whether the GPH extends to the relatively species-rich ground layer. We used a well-replicated experimental approach that included a gap opening gradient (five gap sizes, 6, 10, 20, 30 and 46 m diameter, and undisturbed reference areas), a within-gap location gradient (gap edge to center), and a temporal gradient (0, 2, 6 and 13 years after gap creation). The data were observations of ground-layer plant abundance, published plant traits, and a modeled index of understory light environments.

Citation

Kern, Christel C.; Montgomery, Rebecca A.; Reich, Peter B.; Strong, Terry F. 2013. Canopy gap size influences niche partitioning of the ground-layer plant community in a northern temperate forest. Journal of plant Ecology. 6(1): 101-112. Doi:10.1093/jpe/rts016. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpe/rts016.

Last updated on: April 25, 2013