Publication Details

End-point diameter and total length coarse woody debris models for the United States

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Woodall, C.W.; Westfall, J.A.; Lutes, D.C.; Oswalt, S.N.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Forest Ecology and Management. 25: 3700-3706.

Abstract

Coarse woody debris (CWD) may be defined as dead and down trees of a certain minimumsize that are an important forest ecosystem component (e.g., wildlife habitat, carbon stocks, and fuels). Due to field efficiency concerns, some natural resource inventories only measure the attributes of CWD pieces at their point of intersection with a sampling transect (e.g., transect diameter) although measurements of large-end diameter, small-end diameter, and length are often required by natural resource managers. The goal of this study was to develop a system of empirical models that predict CWD dimensions (e.g., large-end diameter) based on CWD attributes measured at the point of intersection with a sample transect and ancillary data (e.g., ecological province).

Citation

Woodall, C.W.; Westfall, J.A.; Lutes, D.C.; Oswalt, S.N. 2008. End-point diameter and total length coarse woody debris models for the United States. Forest Ecology and Management. 25: 3700-3706.

Last updated on: May 30, 2008