Publication Details

Analysis of U.S. household wood energy consumption: 1967-2009

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Song, Nianfu.; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Goerndt, Michael E.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Energy Economics. 34(6):2116-2124

Abstract

The residential sector consumes about 23% of the energy derived from wood (wood energy) in the U.S. An estimated error correction model with data from 1967 to 2009 suggests that residential wood energy consumption has declined by an average 3% per year in response to technological progress, urbanization, accessibility of non-wood energy, and other factors associated with a time trend such as increasing income per capita and number of houses. But the rising price of non-wood energy has had a positive effect on the consumption and offset the downward trend effect in the last decade. Residential wood energy consumption has also been sensitive to changes in wage rate in both long-run and short-run, but the total estimated wage rate effect since 1967 is negligible. Wood energy is expected to continue to account for a small share of residential energy consumption unless public policies improve wood energy cost competitiveness relative to non-wood energy.

Citation

Song, Nianfu.; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Goerndt, Michael E. 2012. Analysis of U.S. household wood energy consumption: 1967-2009. Energy Economics. 34(6):2116–2124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eneco.2012.03.004.

Last updated on: August 16, 2013