Publication Details

Deferment cutting in central Appalachian hardwoods: an update

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Miller, Gary W.; Johnson, James E.; Baumgras, John E.

Year Published

1997

Publication

Forest Landowner. 56(5): 28-31, 68.

Abstract

Deferment cutting is designed to regenerate a variety of high-quality hardwood species and promote a two-age stand structure for aesthetic, wildlife habitat, and other non-timber binefits. Basal area is reduced enough so that it resembles a seedtree or shelterwood practice in that some overstory trees are retained while all other trees are cut (Figure 1). However, in deferment cutting the residual trees are not cut once the reproduction becomes established as in even-age practices. Instead, the harvest of the residual trees is deferred until new reproduction is between 40 and 80 years old, generally one-half to a full sawtimber rotation. The result is a two-age stand structure.

Citation

Miller, Gary W.; Johnson, James E.; Baumgras, John E. 1997. Deferment cutting in central Appalachian hardwoods: an update. Forest Landowner. 56(5): 28-31, 68.

Last updated on: April 16, 2008