Publication Details

Conservation implications when the next predators are known. Chapter 2

Thompson, Frank R., III; Ribic, Christine A.

Year Published

2012

Publication

In: Ribic, C.A.; Thompson, F.R., III; Pietz, P.J., eds. Video surveillance of nesting birds. Studies in Avian Biology (no. 43). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press: 23-33.

Abstract

Conservation and management of passerines has largely focused on habitat manipulation or restoration because the natural communities on which these birds depend have been destroyed and fragmented. However, productivity is another important aspect of avian conservation, and nest predation can be a large source of nesting mortality for passerines. Recent studies using video surveillance to identify nest predators allow researchers to start evaluating what methods could be used to mitigate nest predation to help passerines of conservation concern. From recent studies, we identified latitudinal and habitat-related patterns in the importance of predator groups that depredate passerine nests. We then reviewed how knowledge of specific nest predators can benefit conservation of bird species of concern.

Citation

Thompson, Frank R., III; Ribic, Christine A. 2012. Conservation implications when the next predators are known Chapter 2. In: Ribic, C.A.; Thompson, F.R., III; Pietz, P.J., eds. Video surveillance of nesting birds. Studies in Avian Biology (no. 43). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press: 23-33.

Last updated on: September 18, 2012