Publication Details

Physiological and environmental causes of freezing injury in red spruce

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Schaberg, Paul G.; DeHayes, Donald H.

Year Published

2000

Publication

In: Mickler, Robert A.; Birdsey, Richard A.; Hom, John, eds. Responses of northern U.S. forests to environmental change. Ecological studies 139. New York: Springer-Verlag: 181-227.

Abstract

For many, concerns about the implications of "environmental change" conjure up scenarios of forest responses to global warming, enrichment of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and the northward migration of maladapted forests. From that perspective, the primary focus of this chapter, that is, causes of freezing injury to red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.), may seem somewhat counterintuitive and inconsistent with the overall theme of the book. However, the dramatically increased incidence of freezing injury to northern montane red spruce forests over the past four decades is, in fact, largely a function of human-induced environmental change.

Citation

Schaberg, Paul G.; DeHayes, Donald H. 2000. Physiological and environmental causes of freezing injury in red spruce. In: Mickler, Robert A.; Birdsey, Richard A.; Hom, John, eds. Responses of northern U.S. forests to environmental change. Ecological studies 139. New York: Springer-Verlag: 181-227.

Last updated on: April 10, 2008